Ellen Wants Textbooks on Citizens’ Education

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has mandated the Ministries of Education (MOE) and Finance and Development Planning (MFDP) to work with the Governance Commission to prepare the needed textbooks in line with the published Curriculum of Citizen’s Education of Liberia.The Curriculum for Citizen’s Education is an academic tool prepared by the Governance Commission (GC) along with other stakeholders including the Ministry of Education and some experts.The President’s mandate was contained in her statement during the 168th celebration of National Flag Day at the Centennial Pavilion on Ashmun Street, Monrovia.Stressing the need for the circulation of the textbooks, President Sirleaf expressed hope that the expected books will be out by 2017 for use in various schools in the Republic.She said as the new curriculum for citizen’s education has been prepared and presented by Governance Commission’s Chairperson, Dr. Amos C. Sawyer, it is imperative that books containing detailed information about Liberia be available in schools to help transform Liberians’ behavior and attitudes in consonance with the curriculum.She also added that as government embarks on the development of textbooks in line with the curriculum for citizen education, there is a need to train teachers that will present lessons.She commended the Governance Commission and stakeholders involved in the development of the curriculum for citizen education and emphasized that textbooks to be published be different from previous ones.President Sirleaf underscored the need to enshrine applicable human rights in the new books to allow Liberian students understand their rights and responsibilities to their country and government.In her Flag Day message, President Sirleaf said the day should remind all Liberians about their duties to their country to develop the spirit of patriotism and unity.She said the flag is Liberia’s identity which depicts spirit of oneness, and should be divorced of politics to be celebrated with one goal of national unity.Speaking earlier, Mrs. Elizabeth Mulbah of the Governance Commission said the completion of the curriculum for citizens’ education is the first in the roadmap leading to national reconciliation under Vision 2030.The curriculum for citizens’ education, according to Mrs. Mulbah took into consideration the rewriting of Liberia’s history and development of textbooks that will contain information about Liberia in line with activities prescribed in said curriculum.She said the curriculum contains syllabi reflecting understanding of Liberian identities, families, governance amongst others.The keynote speaker of the day, Dr. Joseph T. Isaac, spoke on “Patriotism” and defined it in simple terms as respect for one’s nation and remembering those who contributed to national development.He also stressed that patriotism reflects sense of national identity and willingness to promote one’s culture.Describing the flag and relating it to its makers, Dr. Isaac said the seven women who made it demonstrated patriotism to their native country, stressing that patriotism must rely on visionary people who see what others do not see.He said respecting and hoisting the flag shows love for our country and every Liberian should be proud of hoisting the flag.“The flag should remain the national emblem and pride of our country,” he noted.Dr. Isaac said history about the flag should be told to Liberian children and parents should attach importance to it to their children since it represents the pride of the nation.Meanwhile, August 24 of every year is celebrated as National Flag Day and the Ministry of Education usually organizes a program, bringing together schools to carry on both outdoor and indoor activities commemorating the day.The 2014 Flag Day celebration was suspended due to the Ebola outbreak which claimed over 4,000 lives in the country.This year’s celebration brought over 10 schools together and four of them were recognized for their outputs.G.W. Gibson High School took the first place in “eyes-right” competition during the street parade; Cathedral High School recognized for best drill; St. Theresa Convent came third for being the most well dressed school; and Muslim Congress took the place of well disciplined school.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Donegal entrepreneurs leading the way on ACORNS Programme

first_imgAn exciting six months lie ahead for the eight successful Donegal entrepreneurs who have earned a coveted place on the ACORNS initiative for women-led start-up businesses.The businesswomen all battled strong competition to gain a place on the peer-led support network for rural Ireland.Donegal has the highest number of female entrepreneurs on ACORNS this cycle, who will be benefiting from the expert support of Deirdre McGlone. Inishowen is well represented with two participants running their business from the peninsula. The places went to Avril McMonagle founder of Meantóir,  a specialist training and professional support service for early childhood education; and Carlene Lyttle of Sailespin a specialist business support service for companies looking to foster growth. The mantle for the south of the county is being carried by Joanne Butler of OURganic Gardens – a garden project combining education, tourism and community based in beautiful Gort a’Choirce and Meg O’Gara of Megnificent Creative based in Kilcar offering graphic design and creative illustration. Bundoran also features well with Nicola Gavigan from the unique experience Seclusion Spa at Ardfarna and Sinead Fox from the already award-winning Salty Fox Coffee Shop. Marie Hutchinson from the well-being focused Mojo Yoga and Wellness Studio in Donegal Town and Sue Glackin of Donegal Food Tours based in Letterkenny complete the Donegal posse of entrepreneurs embarking on this exciting opportunity. Built on a belief that entrepreneurs learn best from each other, the ACORNS initiative is facilitated by ‘Lead Entrepreneurs’; women who have started and grown successful businesses in rural Ireland. The Donegal Acorns group is led by successful businesswoman Deirdre McGlone, former ‘Donegal Person of the Year’ and President of the Donegal Women in Business Network. Over the next six months Deirdre will work with the eight women-led businesses to maximise their business through peer-support, mentoring, and networking. The businesses supported by the previous Acorns initiative recorded a 43% increase in turnover. Access to finance and marketing were the barriers to developing businesses in rural Ireland, as identified by the participants, which ACORNS aims to address over the next 6 months. ACORNS is funded under the Rural Innovation and Development Fund through the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine. For more information, see www.acorns.ie.Donegal entrepreneurs leading the way on ACORNS Programme was last modified: October 17th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ACORNSNational Women in Enterprise Daywomen in businesslast_img read more

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Ask government for help: Motlanthe

first_img27 February 2012Members of households with no income, students seeking bursaries, job-seekers looking to be re-skilled … Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe has called on South Africans who need help from the government to come forward so they can be assisted.“We are keen to help those who need help,” Motlanthe said during a visit to government War on Poverty projects in Krugersdorp, Gauteng province on Friday.Motlanthe encouraged those who needed assistance to seek help at their local municipal offices.“When people are assisted, they must make a meaningful contribution to the economy,” he added, emphasising that the government was willing to help by re-skilling individuals who had the potential to steer their households out of poverty – calling such individuals “change agents”.The government’s War on Poverty campaign, launched in August 2008, targets the most deprived communities in the country, seeking to reach people with limited or no access to any of the services or programmes offered by the government.Motlanthe was visiting one of these projects, in the form of a food bank set up by the Gauteng provincial government to provide relief to households in distress. The food bank currently supplies food and other essentials to around 60 000 individuals.Motlanthe also visited a small-scale farm in Dunkod which produces herbs and a range of vegetables and supplies to various retailers. The Gauteng government handed over a pack house to the farm as part of government’s programme to assist emerging and small-scale farmers.Motlanthe noted that one of the best ways to win the war on poverty was for people to start growing their own vegetables.Motlanthe was accompanied on his Krugersdorp visit by Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane, Minister in the Presidency for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation, Collins Chabane, MECs and senior provincial government officials.Other dignitaries included Energy Minister Dipuo Peters, Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa, Rural Development and Land Reform Minister Gugile Nkwinti, and Deputy Human Settlements Minister Zou Kota-Frederics.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Technology Trumps Dogma, And Other Open Source Insights

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Matt Asay 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affaircenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Tags:#Marten Mickos#Open Source#strategy A few weeks back I asked Marten Mickos (@martenmickos), CEO of Eucalyptus Systems, to comment on the changing face of open source. He did, and with the usual Mickos style. Unfortunately, a whole lot of great commentary had to be cut for space reasons.Given the brilliant insights Mickos offered, I wanted to share his comments in their entirety here. Mickos helped make MySQL arguably the most popular database on the planet, and is trying to achieve similar success with an open source cloud offering.With a string of successes—and failures—under his belt, Mickos had multiple pearls of open source wisdom to share. For instance while open-source developers have long eschewed corporate influence on open-source projects, Mickos starts by reminds us that money is critical for funding development, not to mention marketing, documentation, etc. The myth of a peace-loving, cashless open source existence is just that: a myth.On the importance of money to open source…Without money, open source will die.On the foundational principle behind open source business strategy…Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time.On the changing face of the open source developer…Back then it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today, many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). When they make public presentations, they have to state that what they say is their own opinion and not necessarily an official statement of the company they represent. There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before.On the role of copyleft licensing and governance…The purpose of the FOSS license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.On leadership…Even in a meritocracy, even in peer-production models, people look for leaders.On critical feedback…If you, on a sustaining basis, can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.”If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular. [This jibes well with my own observations of haters being a leading indicator of success.]On the role of branding…More than a question of licensing, it’s a question of branding. Red Hat took their open source brand “Red Hat” and made it commercial only. Then they established Fedora as the non-commercial brand. MySQL and JBoss did the opposite: they kept one unified brand for both community and commercial use. When you fork, you must use a different name, because branding is not included in the open source licenses.On apparent inconsistencies in open source “theology”…Open source people can be dogmatic, especially about others. They will eagerly demand that some project behave in this or that way for reasons of orthodoxy and purity. But they will at the same time merrily use closed systems such as iBooks because they admire those products. Technology trumps dogma. Coolness is key. All of this I say not as a complaint, but as an observation. To succeed in open source, you must learn to live with it and make the most of it.On changes to open source in the past 10 years…People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, why it wouldn’t self-die, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Today people know open source and they know it’s an essential part of the software world.Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to).Those who did open source just did it. There were very few people blogging about the meaning of open source, thinking about the business models, etc. Today you have those who code, those who lead communities, those who test, those who use, those who make money, those who write about it, etc.Licensing was a big issue then, for good reasons. Now it’s much less of a topic.Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.Back then the infrastructure didn’t exist. Today we have Wiki, Github, Jira and other services that make it obvious how to run and govern an open source project.Ten years ago people would download distributions. Now they upload images (to the cloud).On what hasn’t changed in open source over the past 10 years…Still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naïveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Open source still attracts outstanding talent.The most successful open source projects are those that target developers. Products that are supposed to be used by consumers or other non-technical people generally don’t do as well. But there are notable exceptions, as always, such as Firefox, Android and perhaps OpenOffice.last_img read more

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