GoFundMe Page Created For Wilmington Native In Need Of Wheelchair Accessible Van

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington native Kristen Curran Gannon recently battled an acute life-threatening heart condition. She had an ascending and descending aortic dissection. During one of her surgeries, Kristen suffered irreversible damage to her lower organs and her intestines ruptured, causing a stroke in her spine.Doctors told Kristen that she would no longer have use of her legs and would live the rest of her life in a wheelchair.  She was subsequently diagnosed with Marfan Syndrome, a genetic connective tissue disease that has made it extremely difficult for her to heal and recover.Kristen’s parents are hoping to purchase a wheelchair accessible van with a ramp for Kristen. Kristen’s mom Elaine Curran, was a resident of Wilmington for almost 60 years before moving to New Hampshire. She taught school in Wilmington at the Wildwood and the North Intermediate for almost 40 years before retirement.Kristen’s friends has created a GoFundMe page to assist the family with the purchase. The page reads, in part:Our family has never asked for help and it is not something we are completely comfortable with even now. But, so many people have asked how they can help so we thought if we were able to get help funding a new wheelchair accessible van for Kristen, we could ALL share in something that would have unlimited potential to improve the quality of Kristen’s life as well as our parents who continue to sacrifice every day because they love her so much.Make a donation to the GoFundMe page HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedGoFundMe Page Created For Wilmington Family With 14-Year-Old Battling CancerIn “Community”CEILI STRONG: Music Bingo Fundraiser In Memory Of Ceili Kinneen Set For Tremezzo On October 24In “Community”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Friday, August 30, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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Facial recognition bans spread across America

first_imgThe Oakland (California) City Council has voted to ban facial recognition technology. James Martin/CNET Oakland, California, has has become third city to ban the municipal use of facial recognition technology. Late Tuesday night, the Oakland City Council approved the ordinance, which requires a second and final vote that’s scheduled for Sept. 17.Oakland neighbor San Francisco in May became the first city to ban its police officers from using facial recognition technology, citing a breach of citizens’ civil liberties. The Somerville City Council in Massachusetts followed suit last month. Legal Facial recognition How San Francisco’s ban could impact facial recognition… Mobile Security Computers Politics Security Cameras Now playing: Watch this: 0 Facial recognition technology and human rights Aibo robot dogs and the people who love them 25 Photos Oakland City Council President Rebecca Kaplan, who prepared a report on the proposed ban, cited limitations of the technology, the lack of standards around its implementation, and its potential use in the persecution of minorities, according to KPIX.Matt Cagle, a technology and civil liberties attorney for American Civil Liberties Union Northern California, said it should be elected representatives making decisions on the government’s ability to collect and use facial recognition imaging.”Decisions about whether we want to hand the government the power to identify who attends protests, political rallies, church or AA meetings should not be made in the secret backroom of a police station, lobbied by corporate executives that market this technology,” Cagle said Wednesday in a statement.The ACLU said US House of Representatives on Tuesday night also passed an amendment to the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 that would require the Director of National Intelligence to report on any government use of facial recognition technology (PDF).Reports would include information on the accuracy of the technology, as well as policies and procedures to protect human rights and First Amendment rights. The law shows Congress is recognizing “that this surveillance technology presents an unprecedented threat to our most fundamental democratic values,” said Neema Singh Guliani, ACLU senior legislative counsel. 3:04 null Share your voice San Francisco becomes first city to bar police from using facial recognition AI experts want Amazon to stop selling facial recognition tech to police Huge leaps in AI have made facial recognition smarter than your brain Why facial recognition’s racial bias problem is so hard to crack Smart home cameras bring facial recognition ethics to your front door Tagslast_img read more

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