A leading national disabled peoples organisation

first_imgA leading national disabled people’s organisation (DPO) is to campaign to produce a “sea change” in attitudes to disability, as one of its priorities over the next three years.In its strategic plan for 2016-19, Disability Rights UK (DR UK) says it will focus its campaigning on independent living, improving disabled people’s career opportunities, and – a new priority for the charity – influencing public behaviour and attitudes.In a blog accompanying the document, DR UK chief executive Liz Sayce (pictured) points to a phone-in on BBC Radio 5 live last month in which disabled callers spoke of being “rejected, demonised, stared at, [and] made to feel unwelcome everywhere from playgrounds to trains”. Sayce says DR UK now wants to collect disabled people’s experiences of some of the worst experiences they have faced, “whether it’s being viewed as scroungers or incompetents, being feared or looked down on, avoided or bullied”.And she suggests there is a need for a “strong, united message” that resonates with the public, as with the LGBT movement’s call for “equal marriage”, and the US “black lives matter” campaign.The strategy document says this message needs to demonstrate that disabled people are “contributors” rather than “costs”, and dismantle the “false dichotomy between scroungers and super-heroes”.Sayce says that contact with disabled people – in education, work and elsewhere – will play a huge part in changing the “assumptions and actions” of non-disabled people. “If we campaign to learn together, work together, pray together, live together – that will break down barriers,” she says.The strategy also pledges to help build a national network of hate crime reporting centres, providing safe spaces for disabled people to report hostility and hate crime, and to work closely with other DPOs, police and the Crown Prosecution Service to combat hate crime and hostility.DR UK will also focus on independent living as another of its three priorities, with plans to campaign to reduce the number of disabled people living in institutions and the use of coercive powers to detain and treat people against their will.It will also focus on the funding necessary to live independently, for example through benefits and social care personal budgets; and organise a national campaign on access alongside its members.On career opportunities, DR UK says it wants to show the government the importance of investing in peer support for skills and careers, and to focus on both the “carrots and sticks” that will persuade employers and education and training providers to take action.The strategy highlights some of the statistics it would like to see published by the government – with regional figures for the most important areas – to allow progress towards disabled people’s equality and human rights to be measured.These include the number of disabled people living in institutions; the pay gap between disabled and non-disabled people; and levels of disability discrimination, hostility and hate crime.last_img read more

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The Navigation Center A Haven for the Determined

first_img Tags: homeless • housing • mission street Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0% The Navigation Center is sharply different from the city’s two major shelters offering more than 300 beds each.  These high-capacity shelters, the ones that aren’t set up specifically for youth, women, or families, usually prohibit pets, will separate couples who don’t have children, and bar clients from bringing in their belongings.Moreover, the Navigation Center offers meals, showers, and laundry around the clock, unlike shelters, where meals and other activities are scheduled, along with curfews and quiet hours. In an October interview, Department of Homelessness Director Jeff Kositsky called the Navigation Centers, of which the city now has two and is set to open another next year, “shelters as they should be.” A Welcoming PlaceNavigation Center kitchen area. Photo by Lola M. ChavezOn a Friday afternoon in December, it is  quiet and warm inside the center, a stark contrast to the street outside on Mission near the 16th Street corridor.  There boom boxes blast salsa, groups of street dwellers laugh and talk and cars and buses rumbling through the nearby intersection. Inside a former portable classroom now outfitted with a large television mounted on the wall next to psychedelic donated art, Miguel Hernandez is eating pancakes and sausages from a black plastic microwaveable Meals on Wheels tray. Three other residents are in the nearly-empty room, which is mostly silent except for the compressed blare of the television. Hernandez, born in Cuba,  arrived in the United States in 1980 and though he declined to go into how he ended up without a home, he has been staying in the Navigation Center for nearly six months. He rises at 5:30 a.m. every morning from a cot in another former classroom he shares with 14 others – each classroom at the 75-bed center houses 15. He eats breakfast, then makes his way to Labor Ready, a jobs program with branches on 26th Street and in the Portola. He makes a little bit of money there to pay his phone bill and other small necessities.Navigation Center, sleeping area. Photo by Lola M. Chavez“This is a good place compared to others – my friends have been in others and they say this is the best one,” Hernandez said, referring to the more traditional shelters. Still, “I hope to get out of here pretty soon. Thank God things are going well.” Staff at the center have helped Hernandez access financial assistance, which he hopes will enable him to get an apartment of his own. The Navigation Center’s high ratio of staff to clients makes individualized attention like this possible, from case managers who help with things like getting IDs and General Assistance benefits, to nurses who visit regularly, to Animal Care & Control staff who come to make sure residents’ pets are up to date on vaccines. There are even recurring DMV visit days.Later in the afternoon Hernandez, sat and talked with Enrique Chumpitaz on the wood-paneled benches outside the Navigation Center, soaking up the afternoon rays of sun in the December chill. Inside, the deserted but sunny courtyard slowly attracted five or so residents.Navigation Center, kitchen/common area. Photo by Lola M. ChavezChumpitaz has been there nine months. “For me, it’s like the army, high school and jail all combined,” Chumpitaz said of the Navigation Center after finishing his pancake lunch in the recreation room. “I am 75 years old. This is one experience in my life. Maybe I will write a book about this.”Fortunately, Chumpitaz is about to move into a senior housing facility on 18th and Alabama streets. He never lived on the streets, but paid for rooms in SROs by the week. He arrived at the Navigation Center through a referral from the Mission Neighborhood Resource Center on Capp Street. Now, with a note from his doctor saying an SRO isn’t appropriate for him, he’s getting routed to the senior center.Wayne Henderson has completed his journey of about four months through the Navigation Center, having previously lived on the street. Unlike many others, he already had an ID, he was receiving financial assistance, and his Medicaid was secured.Navigation Center storage space. Photo by Lola M. ChavezHe just needed a place to go, and the center helped him find it. Within three weeks he was offered a space at the Mission Hotel SRO on 16th and South Van Ness streets – but turned it down because the rent would have been too high. “I wasn’t going to give them 70 percent of my income to stay at the Mission Hotel, so I turned it down,” he said.So staff found him an alternative. Henderson now lives at the Henry Hotel, a former SRO turned supportive housing center, and will stay there for a year. If he is still in good standing at the end, he said, he will be transferred to a studio apartment of his own.“Overall my stay there, it was good,” he said. “I really appreciated the staff, they were very welcoming and very helpful.” Unstructured and NonspecificOf course even the Navigation Center isn’t the answer for everyone.For some, even with its low barrier to entry, the center might not be tailored enough, said Henderson. “I’m sleeping next to a woman who’s in her 70s, and she’s got her oxygen tube and she cannot receive the services and assistance that she needs from this one-size-fits-all thing,” he said. “There are people in there who have some mental impairment issues going on, and just lumping everyone in one place, I don’t think that’s right.” Others who aren’t as prepared or driven as Henderson, Chumpitaz or Hernandez may be less successful.Navigation Center laundry room. Photo by Lola M. ChavezDays at the Navigation Center are structured – if they are at all – around the clients’ appointments. The center is setup to accommodate these appointments, be they medical or paperwork related, on-site to make it easier for clients to attend them. Other than that, there are sometimes activities, but a site manager, John Ouertani, didn’t specify what those might be. “We keep ‘em engaged,” he said.During his stay, Henderson said he has seen people miss those very appointments the Navigation Center made it easy for them to reach. “A lot of folks there do not make a lot of their appointments for one reason or another,” he said. Sometimes he would ask fellow residents why they missed their appointments and would hear back, “They don’t tell me what I wanna hear,” he said.Though staff try to be understanding and helpful, habitual drug use at the center can also result in being asked to leave.For still others, the Navigation Center is not quite enough to keep them off the streets, even while they have a bed there.Still on the StreetsNavigation Center courtyard. Photo by Lola M. ChavezWearing a skirt and boots despite the chill, Wendy Glass breezed through the recreation room to pick up a few meal packs, then sat in the courtyard to eat them. She has been at the center for about a month, and found the staff capable and commendable. They recently helped her secure her birth certificate and she hopes they will help her find an SRO room. “You can tell it’s not about the money, this is something they’re dedicated to,” she said referring to the staff. “They have a passion for it.”Glass, for example, isn’t spending her whole day at the shelter – she has things to attend to outside. She usually gets her meals elsewhere and sells goods on the sidewalk to get by, between two and four days a week depending on how money is. She also says many at the center store belongings out on the streets.“A lot of us don’t sleep here…you can’t just abandon [tents]. We come here for appointments, to clean and shower, then check on our stuff,” she said. “Otherwise someone steals our shit. The city steals it from us too.”Navigation Center showers. Photo by Lola M. ChavezAnother resident, sitting on a bench in the sunny courtyard and folding a letter from the shelter informing him of his upcoming shelter date, says he does the same. Though he didn’t specify a reason for his discharge, he did say that he is more of a drop in client.“I don’t sleep here…I have stuff out there,” he said. He’s tired of being homeless and likes the center, but isn’t sure what to do next.“I’ve been on the streets for eight years, it’s hard to break the cycle. This is what I do.”Henderson said this, too, happened during his stay as well.“A lot of folks there were placed there but they were still in the encampments. Either their partner didn’t get in or [they did and] there was some kind of rule violation,” he said. Or, “People had excess of stuff so they have storage…They had a lot of stuff they had accumulated over years of being on the streets.” Though allowing possessions is one of the navigation center’s distinguishing characteristics, Glass said it’s not always possible for the center to store everything a resident may come in with. Randy Quezada, a spokesperson for the Department of Homelessness, said while the shelter does try to accommodate belongings and doesn’t have a specific limit to how much an individual can bring, some come in with hoarding disorders, or people may simply want more space.It can also be hard to adjust to a new lifestyle, he said. “To the extent that you may have some people who will slip out and go back to the tents at night, that happens, and that’s part of the engagement process. I don’t think it’s widespread,” Quezada said. “For some people … that have been living on the streets a long time, it’s hard to re-acclimate to being indoors.”Dog crates that are available at Navigation Center. Photo by Lola M. ChavezAfter all, the shelter’s main feature has been its ability to offer residents autonomy and flexibility. There is no curfew. The only requirement for presence, said Ouertani, is that residents be there at least every 72 hours. Though he did not address the practice of clients staying in their tents, he did acknowledge the strength of past connections. “You’re still associated with whatever you have out there. We’re aware of that,” he said. When it comes to the Navigation Center and moving through it by the rules, “The key word is flexibility. It’s also us learning, too.” center_img Mission Street’s Navigation Center, the city’s first, is lauded for being a low-barrier shelter, a place where street dwellers can come as they are and have all their needs met. For those determined to get off the streets, it can be the pathway to finally getting housing, but others may fall through the cracks as the center is also working with some of the most difficult cases. In principle, the Navigation Center moves people off the streets by allowing the partners, possessions and pets that sometimes bar homeless individuals from traditional shelters elsewhere in the city. Lately, its referrals come primarily from city workers clearing encampments in the Mission District.Navigation Center. Photo by Lola M. ChavezThe spaces at the Mission Street center, all 75 of them, are coveted, because the center has a reputation for flexibility and getting clients, if not housed, then at least better prepared to deal with the system. Some 79 percent of clients who have come through the Navigation Center had a “stable” outcome. In reality, this means that 25 percent have gotten some kind of housing and 54 percent have gotten a ticket home.  The remaining 21 percent have gone to “temporary” or “unstable” exits. last_img read more

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SF no longer has final say over police officer discipline — at

first_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter Welcome news came last Wednesday evening for San Francisco Police Department officers who are facing termination for misconduct: These officers may now appeal their cases to an outside California agency. The San Francisco Police Commission — the civilian oversight body that has traditionally been the sole arbiter of serious police discipline — no longer has final say over whether an officer receives “major discipline,” defined as a 10-day suspension up to termination. The commission voted unanimously last Wednesday to approve the rule change, allowing officers to appeal the commission’s own disciplinary decisions. The buck will now stop with the California Office of Administrative hearings.The quasi-judicial tribunal adjudicates administrative disputes, especially those in which agencies discipline a licensed professional. For example, all Medical Board of California physician disciplinary hearings are heard by a judge from the office. Prior to this rule change, an officer’s only recourse to an unfavorable Police Commission decision was a lawsuit in San Francisco Superior Court — which could be a long and burdensome process. The new process, on the other hand, makes it easier for officers to challenge a decision by the commission, as the process is built-in. “Everyone will appeal — why wouldn’t they?” said one veteran SFPD officer who asked to remain anonymous. Around 80 percent of San Francisco’s public employees are afforded a process to appeal a disciplinary decision, said Susan Gard, a spokeswoman with the city’s Department of Human Resources. However, the police department — along with the fire department — is unique in that discipline is imposed by a board of appointed officials on the recommendation of the chief. But these rule changes take the final decision out of the Police Commission’s hands. This move by the commission to limit its own authority was a long time coming. It came under the mandate of a 2017 appellate ruling that upheld a lawsuit filed against the city by now-retired Officer Paul Morgado. The saga began in 2011, when the Police Commission fired Morgado in connection with a case in which he used racist language and wantonly arrested a black Army veteran in March 2008. Morgado, however, turned around and sued the city — including then-Chief Greg Suhr, the Police Commission and the Office of Citizen Complaints — for violating California’s Public Safety Officers Procedural Bill of Rights, which states that an officer is entitled to appeal a disciplinary decision. A San Francisco Superior Court judge ruled in Morgado’s favor in 2014, and the city lost an appeal in 2017, leaving the city and the Police Commission to come up with a procedure by which officers can appeal its decisions. That procedure was passed last Wednesday. Yet the so-called “Rules of Administrative Appeals” is only a stopgap measure until the commission can come up another process that keeps discipline within the city’s jurisdiction, said Police Commission President Bob Hirsch. “The new process is intended as a short-term fix necessitated by the Morgado decision,” Hirsch said in a text message. “We are working on a more permanent fix which will require a charter amendment.” That could take a long time, however; charter amendments require voter approval.Moreover, it’s unclear to what extent the 2017 ruling and the passage of the new rules apply retroactively to officers disciplined in past years who now might wish to appeal. City Attorney spokesman John Coté deferred to the Police Commission on this question, and Hirsch was unclear on that matter. Morgado, who departed the SFPD in 2011, has worked as a mortgage broker in San Diego for the past seven years. He did not answer Mission Local’s inquiries about whether he plans to appeal. center_img Email Addresslast_img read more

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SAINTS have been awarded Category 1 Academy status

first_imgSAINTS have been awarded Category 1 Academy status following a detailed assessment of their performance and structure.The club has been rated as ‘outstanding’ in recognition of the excellence of their junior development programmes from age 12 upwards.Under the accreditation process, clubs are assessed in three key areas:Quality of leadership and management – the strategy and vision of the Academy and progress made;How well Academies meet the needs of players – the welfare, education and safeguarding that is in place;Delivery of player development system – the approaches used to optimise the development of players through to first grade and England. Saints joined Hull FC, Leeds Rhinos, Warrington Wolves, Widnes Vikings and Wigan Warriors in being rated as outstanding.Five other clubs – Bradford Bulls, Huddersfield Giants, Hull Kingston Rovers, Wakefield Trinity Wildcats and Catalans Dragons – were rated as ‘good’ after making significant improvements over the last 12 months.Castleford Tigers were rated as ‘requires improvement’ but the assessment recognised the strides the club has made since last year.London Broncos and Salford Red Devils did not reach the required standards for Category 1 standard.Saints Academy has been rated as outstanding every year since the grading process began.last_img read more

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Columbus County man to testify against codefendant in murder trial

first_img Michael Williams 33, pleaded in Columbus County Superior Court to second-degree murder, kidnapping and assault with a deadly weapon in the slaying of Deans, 26.Sentencing will take place after Williams testifies in Tyler’s trial.Deans, of Leland, was reported missing April 29, 2015, a day after she told her mother she was going to Columbus County to see her ex-boyfriend who is Tyler’s son.Related Article: Man arrested for December shooting in WhitevilleTo read more, click here. WHITEVILLE, NC (STARNEWS) – A Columbus County man charged in the 2015 killing of Alicia Deans pleaded guilty Monday and agreed to testify against his co-defendant Nathan Tyler Jr., 45.Jury selection in Tyler’s first-degree murder trial begins Tuesday.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Anticipation for a safe successful summer coming to newly dredged inlet

first_img For the last few summers Captain Cane Faircloth has not looked forward to the voyage.“We’d actually have to get going really fast and skip across the sandbar to navigate and get through it, which was super dangerous but it was the only choice that we had,” said the Captain who is also a founding member of the Lockwood Folly Association.That’s all because sand erosion was causing a built up shoaling at the mouth of the Lockwood Folly Inlet. Faircloth says, at low tide, it could be as shallow as 4 feet.Related Article: Checkpoints planned on roads, water this summerFor the past two seasons in Captain Faircloth’s business, Ollie Raja Charters, had to take visitors through the Shallotte River inlet or through the Cape Fear river.That after he and a group of boaters and shrimpers took a stand in 2016.“At the point when it all came together, the core of engineers told us we almost lost the inlet it was almost completely gone,” Faircloth said.They weathered the storm and the dredging came to remove the sand. The Army Corps of Engineers completed it this past winter. Now the inlet is nearly double the depth at low tide as it was before.“Personally I would say the traffic has quadrupled on it since last year,” Faircloth said.It’s that kind of traffic Faircloth claims to also bring a boost to business in the way of fuel or equipment sales. Needless to say, it may not be the smoothest sailing as our Andrew James found out, but Faircloth says it certainly will be safer sailing.“What we’re coming to learn is that the inlet is in the best shape it’s been in the last ten years.”Faircloth says they are still hoping the Coast Guard will put out more navigational beacons, buoys. right now two sit at the inlet’s mouth but eight have been ordered. HOLDEN BEACH, NC (WWAY) –  Over the last few summers, many boaters in Holden Beach or Oak Island stayed away from it. Now the Lockwood Folly Inlet has been dredged and we went to see how smooth sailing will be entering the summer.The inlet has for centuries been a part of nautical traffic. Those with the inlet association tell WWAY’s Andrew James that they almost lost it. Now it’s reportedly in the safest shape sailors have seen in years.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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CFPUA reacts to new report suggested adverse health effects of compounds like

first_img The Cape Fear Public Utility Authority has issued a statement on the report saying, “We are currently working to understand its findings and their relevance to PFAS levels in the finished water of Sweeney Water Treatment Plant.”The report published findings from studies that involved workers that had the highest potential exposure to perfluoroalkyls, followed by the highly-exposed residents in the Mid-Ohio Valley, and then the general population. In one study of workers at the Washington Works facility in West Virginia the average serum PFOA level in 2001–2004 was 1,000 ng/mL or one part per billion. The mean PFOA level in highly-exposed residents near this facility was 423 ng/ml or 423,000 parts per trillion in 2004–2005.The report listed the following as findings from these studies that were adverse health effects from exposure.Pregnancy-induced hypertension/pre-eclampsia (PFOA, PFOS)Liver damage, as evidenced by increases in serum enzymes and decreases in serum bilirubin levels (PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS)Increases in serum lipids, particularly total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (PFOA, PFOS, PFNA, PFDeA) Increased risk of thyroid disease (PFOA, PFOS) Decreased antibody response to vaccines (PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, PFDeA)Increased risk of asthma diagnosis (PFOA)Increased risk of decreased fertility (PFOA, PFOS)Small (<20 g or 0.7 ounces per 1 ng/mL increase in blood perfluoroalkyl level) decreases in birth weight (PFOA, PFOS)Related Article: Trump says he may send ‘Illegal Immigrants’ to Dem districts“This report emphasizes the extreme risk that these chemicals present to the public,” said Ted Leopold of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC, the firm representing plaintiffs in the class action alongside Susman Godfrey LLP. “It confirms the numerous health risks of exposure to PFCs like GenX – and also suggests that we need to consider the cumulative effects of exposure to this family of chemicals. That Chemours would lobby for a tenfold increase to the GenX limit simply flies in the face of sound science and shows the company’s brazen disregard for the health and wellbeing of North Carolinians.”The report cited more findings saying that the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that PFOA is possibly carcinogenic to humans and the EPA concluded that there was suggestive evidence of the carcinogenic potential of PFOA and PFOS in humans. Increases in testicular and kidney cancer have been observed in highly exposed humans.We are digging deeper in this new report and will have more on WWAY news tonight. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – A newly released report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services links chemicals defined as PFOA and PFAS to a series of health defects. GenX is a known chemical within this perflouroalkyl compound.The report was released as a draft for public comment from the Agency of Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. In it, several studies were observed surrounding the health effects of PFOA in humans. PFOA is the formal term for chemical compounds like GenX or C8. Those studies were surrounding high cases of exposure in people around 1,000 ng/ml or one part per billion. Recently Chemours reportedly was requesting the state allow the state health goal for GenX be raised to 71,000 parts per trillion.- Advertisement - last_img read more

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Nonprofit working to give horses new homes

first_imgPENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — When adopting an animal, most people think of dogs or cats. In Pender County, there are multiple horses that need homes.Jewell Horton stopped by Good Morning Carolina to talk about Cape Fear Equine Rescue, the organization’s efforts to re-home horses and why it is important to consider the work it takes to care for an animal before adopting it.- Advertisement – Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue Cape Fear Equine Rescue has two horses available with no applications pending.Libby is a 10-12 year old Appaloosa Mare. According to Horton, she is a previous trail horse and therapy horse. She contracted EPM – a neurologic issues spread by protozoa in Opossum feces. She has undergone treatment and appears resolved. She has had previous stifle issues and injections have significantly helped in the past. She is currently pasture sound with no injections and receiving oral joint supplements. It is possible she could be light riding sound again with injection. Her adoption fee is $200.Serena is a Quarter Horse mare in her early 20s. She is in excellent health and has been previously trial ridden. Staff says she may need an intermediate rider since she hasn’t been ridden in a while. Her adoption fee is $400.Related Article: 21 dead horses found on North Carolina propertyPender County Animal Shelter also has two horses available with no applications pending. Adoption fee is $150 each.Rocky is a 28 year old Appaloosa/Thoroughbred gelding. He requires a special diet because he has nearly teeth. He can ride as a trail horse and is suitable for light riding. Staff says he is a very sweet horse. He was in a recent WWAY story, enjoying a brushing!Misty is a 24 year old Arabian Cross mare. She is a former therapy horse that rides and drives; however, because of her age and hind tendon weakness, it is recommended that she go to a companion-only home. She is a little underweight because of being changed to a lesser quality feed due to finances, but is expected to return to normal with proper diet. Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue Horton also noted that Pender County Animal Shelter has recently reached capacity so they are looking for people who can open up their homes to a four-legged friend. To see animals available for adoption, click here. Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescuecenter_img Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue 1 of 8 Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescue Photo: Cape Fear Equine Rescuelast_img read more

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Columbus Co Agriculture Fair begins despite Florence upcoming storm

first_imgCOLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Despite the damage and impact Hurricane Florence left behind, the Columbus County Agriculture Fair opened Tuesday.The event has been happening for more than 30 years.- Advertisement – Rides and stands are ready for the public to help get their minds off the recent hurricane. But with another storm on the way, staff is taking precautions in case rain and wind come in.“We’re making sure everybody is getting set down and tied down and some of them take them down after they close down tonight or whatever,” Fair President Danny Benton said. “And the carnival, they’re taking the steps to getting all of their rides and stuff set up or taken down if they have to take them down because of the wind.”Benton says that the role of the fair is the same as when Matthew hit in 2016. It’s to bring smiles to everyone’s face and help them relax.Related Article: New Hanover Co. Schools cancel classes on day of teacher rallyGates opened at 5 p.m. Tuesday and the fair will be in town at the Columbus County Fairgrounds through 10 p.m. Sunday.More details about the fair.last_img read more

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Robotics teams kick off season of innovative thinking

first_img “For the six weeks, we build and construct our robot,” said Senior Wired Wizards Member Emma Pleasants.  “On the last day of that sixth week, we stay up til’ midnight and then we wrap up our robot and we send it to competitions. We start in our district and then we move up to states and we’ve actually gone to worlds a couple of times.”After graduating high school, many participants pursue college majors in engineering, computer science and business.Good luck to all participants ! WILMINGTON,NC (WWAY) — The Wired Wizards are ready to take home the gold this year in the FIRST robotics international competition. Saturday launched the six week’s of innovative thinking.Five local high school robotics teams will design and build a fully automated robot to compete locally and across the state. On Saturday, teams were given their theme and challenge for this year’s competition. This year celebrates the 50th year anniversary of Apollo 11’s launch to the moon in July 1969.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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