What Tesla did is truly astonishing says Porsche

first_imgSource: Charge Forward As Porsche is trying to bring to market its first all-electric vehicle, they look admirably at Tesla’s success, which they see as “astonishing” when it comes to volume and pricing. more…The post What Tesla did is ‘truly astonishing’, says Porsche appeared first on Electrek.last_img

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Elon Musk is brutally honest about Teslas board and SEC I can

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Following his settlement with the SEC over his comments made on Twitter, Elon Musk had to step down from his role of Chairman of Tesla’s board.Some have been questioning his influence over the board in his new role, but in a new interview, Musk was brutally honest about Tesla’s board and the SEC situation – saying that he “can get anything done that he wants” because he is the largest shareholder. more…The post Elon Musk is brutally honest about Tesla’s board and SEC: ‘I can get anything done that I want’ appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Green Deals 2pack of solar landscaping spotlights for 20 more

first_imgSource: Charge Forward StarTOP (100% positive lifetime feedback) via Amazon offers a 2-pack of LITOM 12 LED Solar Landscape Spotlights for $19.99 Prime shipped. Regularly around $25, this is a new all-time low that we’ve tracked and is the best available. If you’re looking to upgrade your outdoor areas, this is a great way to do so. Since these are solar powered, you’ll never have to worry about batteries or wires. Plus, these spotlights provide up to 600 lumens of light to illuminate your yard perfectly. Rated 4.4/5 stars. more…The post Green Deals: 2-pack of solar landscaping spotlights for $20, more appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Review 25 mph Horizon electric scooter offers full suspension for just 649

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Gone are the days when electric scooters used to cost an arm and a leg for a poorly assembled hunk of junk. Today we’ve got countless options for high quality scooters that run circles around the cheap usual suspects like Xiaomi or Ninebot. The latest one we’ve tested is the Horizon electric scooter from FluidFreeRide. This bad boy can hit road-ready speeds and has full suspension to improve ride comfort.Best of all? It’s quite affordable! more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Review: 25 mph Horizon electric scooter offers full suspension for just $649 appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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To Reduce Corruption Just Put Foreign Officials On Scales

first_imgAs long as there has been corruption (that would be quite a while), well-intentioned societies and individuals have sought ways to reduce corruption as well as measure corruption.It turns out, there is a fool-proof way to measure corruption and expose its occurrence.As highlighted in this article:“In today’s age of expense scandals and hidden bank accounts, a medieval custom of weighing elected officials in public may have new cachet. The annual weigh-in, seen as a metaphor for politicians’ misuse of public funds and a mechanism for accountability, persists in High Wycombe, a large town outside London otherwise known for making furniture.To residents hundreds of years ago, proof was literally in the pudding: A widening of the waistline was jeered as a sign that an official had grown fat at taxpayers’ expense. Shrinking girth was applauded as a sign of responsibility and abstemiousness, suggesting that a leader had been working hard on the people’s behalf. Each May, the mayor and other town officials are seated on brass scales in the middle of the town square. Alongside them is the macebearer, who carries a huge gilded club topped with a crown.The weigh-in is preceded by a “tolling out” ceremony involving bell ringing that originated in 1678 when residents, irate at their drunken mayor, stripped him of his authority. According to records, “in token thereof it was ordered that the great bell should be rung out in testimony of his misdemeanours.”At the weigh-in, for those who have gained from the previous year, the macebearer shouts “and some more!” which in the old days led to the crowd flinging rotten fruit at the profligate officials. Those who lost weight are rewarded by the macebearer’s “and no more!” — and by the crowd’s inevitable cheers.”Happy April Fools’ Day from FCPA Professor.last_img read more

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Oscars Flub the Ageist KneeJerk Response – A Challenge

first_imgTweet7Share27Share5Email39 SharesThis posted original appeared on EdenAlt.orgSo, I watched the Oscars with a friend last night.  As midnight here on the East Coast neared, it was time to reveal the winning film for the Best Picture category. Like a bizarre replay of the recent Miss Universe foible, the wrong film was announced as the winner.   A little time would reveal that the mistake involved a backstage mix-up in the handoff of the envelopes to the award presenters.  Yet, immediately after the kerfuffle took place, several comments and Tweets let loose, targeting the age of the esteemed presenters, Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway.Here are two of the most gifted artists in film history, with several award-winning acting and directing credits between them, who were chosen to present this prestigious award in honor of the 50th anniversary of their lauded 1967 film “Bonnie and Clyde.”   In the blink of an eye, they were reduced from icons to the “old people.”  One well-intended Tweet still left a sting saying, “Don’t y’all go blaming the old people for that one.  They gave Warren Beatty the wrong envelope.”Ah, the knee-jerk response that is ageism….  I’ve been teaching and speaking and writing about ageism for years now.  But, this was one of those times it felt deeply personal for me, even if I can’t call Faye and Warren BFFs.  Here were two artistic giants from MY time.  As a lover of fine films, I grew up watching Warren and Faye own the screen in darkened movie theaters (yeah, pre-Netflix and all).  They deserved better than this.For all the joy it can bring by creating connectedness, the speed of social media seems to give us permission to blurt the first thoughtless thing that comes to mind and broadcast it to millions. This is, indeed, its shadow side. When it comes to ageism and ableism (or any ism, for that matter), the speed/easy access combination creates a forum where negative messaging can reverberate at the speed of light.So, I have a challenge for you.  Let’s flood social media today (this week!) with positive reflections of the Elders in our lives!  Let’s turn that speed and reach around to serve our mission! Share a bit of wisdom from an older, wiser human that has touched you, buoyed you, or transformed you.  Reflect on the brilliance, kindness, creativity, or thoughtfulness of an Elder in your world.  Tweet, post, or shout it from the rooftops.  It really can be different….Related PostsAgeism at the OscarsDid you watch the Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night? Not having seen most of the movies, I hadn’t intended to do so plus, it feels like a anachronism these days, watching famous rich people applaud themselves. From a strictly production point of view, I thought it was fine, as glamorous…ESKATON’S “LIFE IS A BALL” WINS ALFA FILM AWARD.ESKATON’S “LIFE IS A BALL” WINS ALFA FILM AWARD. Consistent with the metaphor behind “Life is a Ball” short film, the 2011 production continues to take on new life.   The Assisted Living Federation of America (AFLA) shared the go…From Ageism to Age PrideAshton Applewhite stands before a room of dozens of people expecting to hear the same ‘ol spiel. Instead, she poses a question: “What is every person in this room going to become?” When no one offers an answer she continues. “Older. The prospect has an awful lot of us scared…Tweet7Share27Share5Email39 SharesTags: Ageism Social Medialast_img read more

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Morning Roundup June 21 2019

first_imgCharles Matthews went undrafted after he recently tore his ACL. Jordan Poole surprised a lot of people when he went #28 to the Warriors (LINK). Michigan has been churning out first-round NBA Draft picks: 2013: Tim Hardaway; Trey Burke2014: Mitch McGary; Nik Stauskas2016: Caris LeVert 2017: DJ Wilson 2018: Moe Wagner 2019: Jordan Poole— Alejandro Zúñiga (@ByAZuniga) June 21, 2019  1 0You need to login in order to vote Nick Baumgardner has a fluff piece on incoming freshman offensive lineman Nolan Rumler (LINK). Nolan Rumler Iggy Brazdeikis went #47 overall to the Knicks (LINK). Tags: morning roundup, Nolan Rumlerlast_img read more

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Study explores current understanding of human physiology pathology trauma and surgery in

first_imgJun 20 2018With renewed public interest in manned space exploration comes the potential need to diagnose and treat medical issues encountered by future space travellers. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review explores current understanding of human physiology, pathology, trauma and surgery in space.Known physiological alterations during space travel include fluid redistribution, cardiovascular changes, and bone and muscle atrophy. In addition to common illnesses and conditions, space travellers may also develop novel pathologies that could arise from prolonged weightlessness, exposure to cosmic radiation, and trauma.The authors note that the extreme environment of space produces several unique changes in human physiology that future practitioners of space-surgery must take into consideration.”Manned space exploration has re-entered the public consciousness thanks to endeavours by SpaceX and Virgin Galactic, amongst others,” said lead author Dr. Sandip Panesar, of the University of Pittsburgh. “I became interested in the practical aspects of performing surgery in space. My literature search revealed that potential pathology and trauma situations would differ from those on earth due to specific physiological adaptations to the extraterrestrial environment.” Source:http://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/wiley-research-headlines/surgery-spacelast_img read more

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TTUHSC El Paso recognized as HispanicServing Institution

first_img Source:http://elpaso.ttuhsc.edu Aug 17 2018The U.S. Department of Education has recognized Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso (TTUHSC El Paso) as a Title V Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), making it the second Health-Related Institution in the nation to receive this designation and the only one located on the U.S.-Mexico border.To qualify as an HSI, an institution must have an undergraduate enrollment of at least 25 percent Hispanic students, among other criteria. As of 2017, 41 percent of TTUHSC El Paso’s student body identified as Hispanic. Recognition as an HSI opens doors to new sources of grant funding through the Department of Education and other federal agencies.Based on 2015 data used to make the HSI designation, 72 percent of TTUHSC El Paso’s undergraduate nursing students identified as Hispanic, compared to a state average of less than 30 percent. Twenty-three percent of TTUHSC El Paso’s medical students identified as Hispanic, while the state average is about 15 percent.Related StoriesIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data TsunamiBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryB. Braun awarded prestigious quality mark by Royal College of Surgeons of EnglandWith Hispanics driving population growth in the state and nation, this means TTUHSC El Paso is ahead of the game in terms of Hispanic representation.”Recognition as a Hispanic-Serving Institution is a catalyst for growth,” said TTUHSC El Paso President Richard Lange, M.D., M.B.A. “As a university created in a Hispanic-majority community, we have an opportunity to advocate for the nation’s fastest-growing demographic, which is still vastly underrepresented in health care. Being an HSI will give us the funding we need to close that gap.”The HSI designation was established under Titles III and V of the Higher Education Act of 1965 to increase higher education accessibility for Hispanics. Grants for HSIs, which include the National Science Foundation’s Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Hispanic-Serving Institutions program, also enable HSI-designated institutions to grow and refine their programs.”At TTUHSC El Paso, we see our diversity as one of our major strengths,” said Vice President for Outreach and Community Engagement Jose Manuel de la Rosa, M.D., M.Sc.”Our university values cultural, socioeconomic and intellectual diversity because it enriches our lives and our community as a whole, promoting access, equity and excellence. We strive to create an environment of mutual respect, appreciation and inclusion of differing values, beliefs and backgrounds throughout all our programming. It is a major achievement for us to be recognized by the Department of Education as one of the few Health-Related Institutions in the country to be designated a Hispanic-Serving Institution. It reflects success in meeting our mission of serving our El Paso and border communities.”TTUHSC El Paso’s HSI status went into effect in April 2018. As of August 2018, three TTU System institutions have been designated as Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Texas Tech University, Angelo State University and now, TTUHSC El Paso.last_img read more

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Encapsulating biomedical micromotors in traditional pill form

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 5 2018Using tiny micromotors to diagnose and treat disease in the human body could soon be a reality. But keeping these devices intact as they travel through the body remains a hurdle. Now in a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have found a way to encapsulate micromotors into pills. The pill’s coating protects the devices as they traverse the digestive system prior to releasing their drug cargo.About the width of a human hair, micromotors are self-propelled microscopic robots designed to perform a host of biomedical tasks. In previous research, Joseph Wang, Liangfang Zhang and colleagues used micromotors coated with an antibiotic to treat ulcers in laboratory mice. They found that this approach produced better results than just taking the drugs by themselves. However, the researchers noted that body fluids, such as gastric acid and intestinal fluids, can compromise the effectiveness of micromotors and trigger early release of their payloads. In addition, when taken orally in fluid, some of the micromotors can get trapped in the esophagus. To overcome these issues, Wang and Zhang sought to develop a way to protect and carry these devices into the stomach without compromising their mobility or effectiveness.The researchers created a pill composed of a pair of sugars — lactose and maltose — that encapsulated tens of thousands of micromotors made of a magnesium/titanium dioxide core loaded with a fluorescent dye cargo. These sugars were chosen because they are easy to mold into tablet, can disintegrate when needed and are nontoxic. When given to laboratory mice, these pills improved the release and retention of the micromotors in the stomach compared to those encapsulated in silica-based tablets or in a liquid solution. The researchers concluded that encapsulating micromotors in traditional pill form improves their ability to deliver medicines to specific targets without diminishing their mobility or performance.Source: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/presspacs/2018/acs-presspac-september-5-2018/a-pill-for-delivering-biomedical-micromotors.htmllast_img read more

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Lecture on how healthcare technology evolves through innovation invention and disruption

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 10 2018On September 5, 2018 Professor Sebastien Ourselin, Head of the School of Biomedical Engineering & Imaging Sciences at King’s College London spoke at the 2018 FORUM Annual Lecture, ‘Transforming healthcare through engineering and technology’.Held by the Academy of Medical Sciences in partnership with the Royal Academy of Engineering, the 2018 Lecture brought together world leaders in the medical technologies and engineering fields to discuss how the latest technological advances will impact the clinical pathway, from early research and development through to trials and delivery, and what practical and ethical considerations should be in place.Related StoriesCould formal health technology assessment be a solution to high healthcare costs in the US?Smart phone health monitoring devices will revolutionize healthcareHealthcare solutions of the future: Boehringer Ingelheim relies on digitalizationThe panel was chaired by Professor Sir Robert Lechler PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, Provost and Senior Vice-President of Health at King College London, and Executive Director of King’s Health Partners.Omar Ishrak, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at Medtronic, and alumnus of King’s College London, delivered the captivating keynote speech on how healthcare technology evolves through innovation, invention, and disruption, “There’s no line in the sand in 2018 that says it’s going to stop,” he said. Further, Ishrak also argued that the economic value of new developments must be considered during research to ensure technology can be fully realized.Prof Ourselin’s talk, titled “From Academic Research to Clinical Impact in Surgical and Interventional Engineering”explored how the field of surgery is being reshaped through advances in sensors, robotics, big data, and artificial intelligence. “Patient-specific information can be gathered and analyzed in real-time, from years before the intervention, during the surgery, and over the rehabilitation and long-term follow-up, making patient treatment safer and more effective,” he said. However,he explained, in order to evolve from present surgical methods to AI-powered technology, the gap between clinical research and industry implementation (known as the ‘translational gap’) needs to be bridged, “Investment in platform development, agile quality management, and system integration plays an essential role in bringing the next generation of surgical innovation to the clinic,”. Source:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/last_img read more

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Cellular environment affects type of tumor development

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 12 2018Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Two different forms of primary liver cancer cover the majority of cases: About 10 to 20 percent of those affected develop a bile duct carcinoma within the liver (intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma; ICC), the far higher proportion of liver cancers are hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In recent years, in particular, the number of patients with the highly invasive intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinomas increased noticeably, although both tumor types show overlaps regarding their risk factors. A team of researchers led by Prof. Lars Zender from the University Hospital Tübingen and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) now elegantly demonstrated that the surrounding cellular environment with its dying liver cells determines the path taken by tumor cells. The results will be published in the prestigious journal Nature on September 12, 2018.While progress in early detection and treatment has led to a reduction in mortality for many other types of cancer, there has been a dramatic increase in mortality among patients who have cancer within the liver. Especially fatty liver, which is becoming increasingly common in western countries, now leads to chronically pre-damaged livers in many patients, which are a risk factor for liver cancer. Strikingly, patients with the same predisposition or liver damaging risk factors either develop hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma.Both cancers are different regarding their behavior and are also treated differently.The microenvironment of cancer cells, and in particular, the special form of cell death occuring in this environment, proved to be decisive for the development of the respective type of cancer. The scientists showed that precursors of cancer cells in whose environment cells died by apoptosis, the classical cell death, developed into hepatocellular carcinoma. Precancerous cells, in whose environment cells died due to necroptosis, led to intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. In necroptosis, the cell membrane dissolves, and the cell content causes inflammation in the environment of the cancer cell, while in classical programmed cell death small vesicles are formed which are eliminated by the immune system.Related StoriesExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’The results could be verified both in mouse models and in human tissue samples. Cancer researcher Xin Wei Wang from the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, USA) contributed crucial human analysis data, and Oliver Bischof, a distinguished epigeneticists from the Institut Pasteur (Laboratory of Nuclear Organization and Oncogenesis) in Paris, unraveled how the microenvironment affects gene regulation in the cancer cell.What do the findings mean for clinical practice? “Future research will have to investigate whether the direct cell environment affects not only the type of tumor development but also the therapy,” says Professor Lars Zender. In the treatment of HCC with chemoembolization, it has already been observed that a part of the original liver cancer can turn into a bile duct carcinoma. This could be a reason why the cancer no longer responds to the original therapy. “We may be on the trail of a therapy resistance mechanism for liver cancer,” explains the renowned oncologist and “we hope that the findings will inform novel therapeutic options in the future.”​ Source:https://uni-tuebingen.de/last_img read more

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Fauci and Collins agree to agree on Ebola vaccine development and NIH

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe As it turns out, Fauci and Collins agree that big pharma’s lack of interest in Ebola vaccine development is the main reason no product was ready for this epidemic.In 2000, NIH researchers published the first convincing evidence that an Ebola vaccine—built around an adenovirus “vector” that carried a gene for the Ebola surface protein—could protect monkeys. A review article about the field in 2003, co-authored by leading Ebola vaccine developer Thomas Geisbert now at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, noted that the “small global market has generated little commercial interest.” But preclinical research into different Ebola vaccines, in part funded by NIAID, continued apace. Five years later, in a study that used the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as the vector for an Ebola gene, Geisbert and co-authors wrote: “Remarkable progress has been made over the last few years in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates.”Geisbert told ScienceInsider he “completely” agrees with Fauci’s assessment. “His comment is spot on,” Geisbert says. “The smaller companies that were working on Ebola vaccines and treatments did not have the financial resources” to make the clinical grade product needed to stage human studies. NIH funding typically supports research, not product development.There were also problems with the strain of adenovirus that served as a backbone of the NIH vaccine in the 2000 experiment—known as Ad5. It was also used in an AIDS vaccine, but in 2013 was clearly linked to increased risk of transmission of HIV. Researchers using Ad5 for other vaccines promptly dropped it; NIH’s current Ebola vaccine now in early human trials uses a chimpanzee adenovirus. If NIH had invested in the scale-up of the Ad5-based Ebola vaccine, the vials may well have ended up in the trash.Geisbert’s VSV approach was funded primarily by the Public Health Agency of Canada, not NIH. That vaccine entered human trials last week. Geisbert is now pursuing yet another VSV vaccine, made by Profectus Biosciences in Tarrytown, New York and Baltimore, Maryland, that he believes has a better safety profile.Collins says he and Fauci agree that if the NIH had not lost “purchasing power” over the past decade, “NIH-funded Ebola research would be further along,” he wrote ScienceInsider in a statement. “[C]onstrained resources have slowed the process in developing an Ebola vaccine,” he wrote. But Collins backpedaled on his earlier comment, echoing Geisbert. “Because of the extremely limited market potential prior to the 2014 outbreak, there was little industrial interest in an Ebola vaccine,” he noted.  “So while NIH readiness might well have advanced to a later stage without the budget situation, it would still have been difficult to have hundreds of thousands of doses of a vaccine in vials, ready to administer.”*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.center_img On Meet the Press yesterday, Anthony Fauci was asked whether it was “hyperbole” that the world would have an Ebola vaccine today if Congress had more generously funded the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). “You can’t say we would or would not have this or that,” said Fauci, who heads NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, a leading supporter of Ebola vaccine research.A week earlier, here’s what Fauci’s boss, NIH Director Francis Collins, told The Huffington Post: “Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would’ve gone through clinical trials and would have been ready.”NIAID’s high-profile director challenging the NIH director is the kind of political contretemps that easily explodes into a great inside-the-Beltway brouhaha. Witness the story in The Washington Post story today, “A public dispute between NIH officials over Ebola,” that references several other related stories. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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Rewilding landscapes with rhinos and reindeer could prevent fires and keep Arctic

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Restoring reindeer, rhinoceroses, and other large mammals could help protect grasslands, forests, and tundra from catastrophic wildfires and other threats associated with global warming, new studies suggest. The findings give advocates of so-called trophic rewilding—reintroducing lost species to reestablish healthy food webs—a new rationale for bringing back the big grazers.Rewilding offers “solutions to some of the important problems arising from climate change,” says ecologist Jens-Christian Svenning of Aarhus University in Denmark, an editor of a special issue on the topic published this week in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. “The scope for … beneficial spin-offs for human society is tremendous,” adds co-editor Elisabeth Bakker, an ecologist at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology in Wageningen.Rewilding is often associated with an ambitious proposal to restore large mammals, including even ice age mammoths, to a huge park in Russia. But mammoth resurrection is still just a dream, and most rewilders are focused on restoring animals including giant tortoises, dam-building beavers, or herds of grazers. In large enough numbers, caribou and other large grazers could slow the thawing of permafrost. By Elizabeth PennisiOct. 23, 2018 , 4:20 PM ‘Rewilding’ landscapes with rhinos and reindeer could prevent fires and keep Arctic cool Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Sylvain CORDIER/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images Email Now, it seems rewilding could offer a climate bonus. As the planet has warmed, fire seasons have become 25% longer than they were 30 years ago, and more areas are experiencing severe blazes, notes ecologist Christopher Johnson of the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia. He and his colleagues combed the literature back to 1945 for data on habitats around the world that have lost or gained large grazers, to see whether they experienced change in fire frequency or intensity. They found studies of 14 ancient landscapes up to 43,000 years old that used fungal spores associated with dung as a proxy for herbivore abundance, charcoal as a proxy for fire frequency, and pollen to reveal past vegetation. In about half of the landscapes, fires increased and the vegetation changed after the herbivores disappeared, they report. The other studies saw no clear effect.The researchers also examined records from three modern landscapes, including the 100-year-old Hluhluwe Imfolozi Park in South Africa. There, data show larger and more frequent fires occurred after managers culled or moved large grazers, including white rhinos, wildebeests, zebras, buffalos, and impalas. (Rangers moved the animals as part of tsetse fly eradication efforts or to reduce overgrazing.) In the case of white rhinos, fires averaged just 10 hectares when the animals were present—because they kept plants closely cropped, and their paths created fire breaks—but increased to an average of 500 hectares after the rhinos vanished.Similarly, in Australian grasslands, Johnson’s team found that herds of feral swamp buffalos have helped control wildfires by similar means. When the researchers examined the herbivore and fire history of the southwestern United States, other grazers—including pronghorn antelopes, desert bighorn sheep, bison, and even domestic cattle—seemed to have helped starve fires by eating the grasses that serve as fuel. Modeling studies, meanwhile, suggest some grazers reduce fire risks by disturbing the soil, which buries leaf litter and other flammable material. The bottom line, Johnson and his colleagues write, is that “vertebrates can have strong effects on fire regimes,” and restoring large grazers could be a fairly effective control measure at a time when risks are growing.Other studies suggest grazers can also help maintain tundra—the semifrozen, treeless ecosystem found in the Arctic and on high mountains. In the Arctic, rapidly warming temperatures are enabling trees and shrubs to invade the tundra. The woody plants amplify Arctic warming by absorbing heat and trapping a layer of snow that insulates the ground, keeping it warmer. The result is that the soil thaws and releases even more stored carbon and other warming gases.Reintroducing large numbers of herbivores to browse on the shrubs could help stop this vicious cycle, write ecologists Johan Olofsson at Umeå University in Sweden and Eric Post at the University of California, Davis. The more species—muskoxen, moose,  bison, or caribou (also known as reindeer)—the better. But they say the biggest benefit might come from rethinking existing hunting and development rules to create the densest and most diverse herds possible. Rewilding might be “one of the few ways humans in the Arctic can mitigate global warming, or at least its consequences,” Olofsson says.Others are skeptical. Like any ecosystem re-engineering effort, the long-term effects of rewilding are hard to anticipate, warns Joseph Bump, an ecologist at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul. Some modeling, for example, suggests increased Arctic grazing will lead to greater carbon release, not less. And creating Arctic herds big enough to make a difference could be difficult, says ecologist Andrew Tanentzap of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. They could become “a drop in the bucket in the sea of melting permafrost.”Even the strongest rewilding advocates concede its limits. “It would be overly optimistic to claim rewilding as ‘the solution’ to climate change,” Svenning says. “But [it] clearly can play a role.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Astronomers have spotted the universes first molecule

first_img Astronomers have spotted the universe’s first molecule To find the elusive molecule, astrochemists search for characteristic frequencies of light it emits, particularly a spectral line in the far infrared typically blocked by Earth’s atmosphere. But a far-infrared spectrometer aboard SOFIA allowed them to find that signature for the first time, in a planetary nebula called NGC 7027 (pictured above), the researchers report today in Nature. The result shows this unlikely molecule—involving typically unreactive helium—can be created in space. With this cornerstone confirmed, it appears that the evolution of the following 13 billion years of chemistry stands on firmer ground. William B. Latter (SIRTF Science Center/Caltech); NASA/ESA The universe’s very first molecule, thought to be created after the big bang, has been detected in space for the first time. Helium hydride (HeH), a combination of helium and hydrogen, was spotted some 3000 light-years from Earth by an instrument aboard the airborne Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a telescope built into a converted 747 jet that flies above the opaque parts of Earth’s atmosphere.HeH has long been thought to mark the “dawn of chemistry,” as the remnants of the big bang cooled to about 4000 K and ions began to team up with electrons to form neutral atoms. Researchers believe that in that primordial gas, neutral helium reacted with hydrogen ions to form the first chemical bond joining the very first molecule.In 1925, chemists synthesized HeH in the lab. In the 1970s, theorists predicted that the molecule may exist today, most likely formed anew in planetary nebulae, clouds of gas ejected by dying sunlike stars. But decades of observations failed to find any, casting doubts on the theory. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email By Daniel CleryApr. 17, 2019 , 2:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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Standin On The Corner Park mural

first_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Photo by Greg HacklerCity workers and a crew from the Winslow Complex removed panels of the mural in the Standin’ On The Corner Park at Second Street and Kinsley Avenue for restoration. It is estimated at the restoration will cost about $30,000, with $15,000 raised so far by organizers. May 28, 2018center_img Standin’ On The Corner Park murallast_img

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Top stories The science of false confessions transforming blood types and Brazils

first_img Email On any given day, hospitals across the United States burn through some 16,500 liters (35,000 pints) of donated blood for emergency surgeries, scheduled operations, and routine transfusions. But recipients can’t take just any blood: For a transfusion to be successful, the patient and donor blood types must be compatible. Now, researchers analyzing bacteria in the human gut have discovered that microbes there produce two enzymes that can convert the common type A into a more universally accepted type.Brazilian government accused of suppressing data that would call its war on drugs into questionIs Brazil experiencing a drug epidemic? The answer to that question has spiraled into a legal battle between scientists and government officials over the release of a national drug use survey done by the renowned Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Researchers familiar with the study accuse government officials of suppressing publication of the survey because it contradicts a political assertion that drug abuse is a growing and widespread problem in Brazil.Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a siblingAnts are famous for putting themselves at risk for the wellbeing of their colony, but desert harvester ants are especially heroic. New research suggests the insects charge into spiderwebs to rescue their ensnared nestmates, sometimes ripping the silk apart to free them.Spotted for the first time: a fish holding its breath underwaterLike us, fish need oxygen to survive. But to breathe, most pull oxygen-containing water into their mouths and pump it through their gill chambers before expelling it out of their gill slits. Now, for the first time, scientists have seen fish “holding” that breath, some for up to 4 minutes at a time. This psychologist explains why people confess to crimes they didn’t commitFalse confessions are surprisingly common. That’s in part because standard interrogation techniques place suspects under psychological stresses from which a confession can seem like the only escape. Now, psychologists and other scientists studying interrogation methods and false confessions are placing more scrutiny on a piece of evidence once held as irrefutable in a court of law.Type A blood converted to universal donor blood with help from bacterial enzymes By Alex FoxJun. 14, 2019 , 4:15 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Top stories: The science of false confessions, transforming blood types, and Brazil’s war on drugs (left to right): DREW GURIAN; ISTOCK.COM/ARINDAM GHOSH; FABIO TEIXEIRA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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ICJ verdict on Kulbhushan Jadhav Sushma Swaraj calls it great victory for

first_img Former EAM Sushma Swaraj moves out of her official residence in Delhi Related News Sushma Swaraj intervenes after visa denied to German Padma Shri awardee Former foreign minister Sushma Swaraj hailed the ICJ verdict asking Pakistan to review death sentence awarded to Kulbhushan Jadhav alleging he was a spy.Former foreign minister Sushma Swaraj Wednesday welcomed the verdict delivered by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) asking Pakistan to review the death penalty given to former Indian Navy commander Kulbhushan Jadhav in 2017. India had asked the UN court to intervene in the case, as it said Jadhav had been given an unfair trial and had been denied diplomatic assistance by Pakistan. Delhi Confidential: Far From The Crowd A look at India’s arguments and Pakistan’s defenceThe court found by 15 votes to 1 that Pakistan had breached Jadhav’s rights under the Vienna convention on consular relations by not allowing Indian diplomats to visit him in jail, according to the document.The verdict in the high-profile case comes nearly five months after a 15-member bench of ICJ led by Judge Yusuf had reserved its decision on February 21 after hearing oral submissions by India and Pakistan. The proceedings of the case took two years and two months to complete. Advertising By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 17, 2019 7:49:57 pm In a series of tweets, Swaraj said she was confident that the verdict will provide solace to family members of Jadhav.“I wholeheartedly welcome the verdict of International Court of Justice in the case of Kulbhushan Jadhav. It is a great victory for India. I thank the Prime Minister Shri @narendramodi for our initiative to take Jadhav’s case before International Court of Justice. I thank Mr.Harish Salve for presenting India’s case before ICJ very effectively and successfully. I hope the verdict will provide the much-needed solace to the family members of Kulbhushan Jadhav.”Kulbhushan Jadhav ICJ Verdict Live UpdatesMore importantly, the world court also asserted that Pakistan violated the Vienna Convention, adding that India has right to consular access to Kulbhushan Jadhav. It said Pakistan deprived India of the right to communicate with and have access to Jadhav and thereby breached obligations incumbent upon it under Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. ‘You will be missed’: Netizens emotional as Sushma Swaraj says goodbye to MEA Advertising 30 Comment(s)last_img read more

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