Mocha resident to stand trial in High Court for rape

first_imgForty-seven-year-old Jegede Hodge of Plantation Mocha Arcadia, East Bank Demerara, was on Tuesday committed to stand trial in the High Court for a rape committed on a then 14-year-old girl back in 2017.Hodge appeared in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Tuesday and was handed down the judgement by Principal Magistrate Judy Latchman in the form of a paper committal during the matter which was held in-camera.Initially, he was not required to plead to the indictable charge, which alleged that between September 1 and 30, 2017, while at Plantation Mocha EBD, he engaged in sexual penetration with the child, who was under the age of consent. The prosecution had contended that, on the day in question, the child was left in Hodge’s care.However, Hodge was granted bail in the sum of $300,000 when he made his first court appearance. The matter was prosecuted by Inspector Shellon Daniels.last_img read more

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Bandits terrorise La Jalousie family

first_imgA West Coast Demerara (WCD) family is left traumatised after four unmasked bandits, all armed, barged into their business and terrorised them before taking off with an undisclosed sum of cash and other items. Guyana Times understands that the robbery took place sometime around 12:10h on Saturday at a grocery shop at Lot 26 La Jalousie Public Road, WCD. The owner, businessman Bhupaul Panday, was in the shop with his wife, son and daughter along with two customers when the bandits pounced on them.It was reported that the perpetrators tied up the six individuals with duct tape as they ransack the premises in search of valuables.A relative related to this newspaper that the men stormed the shop, all armed with handguns, and kicked down the door to gain entry behind the counter. The men immediately began ripping out the electronics in the house including the computers, the DVR attached to the surveillance camera and the phone lines.“They just walked in and kick down the door… and start ripping off all the electronics in the house and beat up the people them,” the relative stated.They then began to terrorise the family, asking for money and other valuables, the relative noted. The bandits then duct-taped the four Panday family and the two customers as they searched the house for whatever valuables they could get their hands on. However, they kept on hitting the owners, demanding more money and jewellery.“They took a bunch of things with them, personal items and so on but they keep hitting the people them, as if what they were taking weren’t enough. They wanted more,” the relative noted.After some time, the four bandits realised time was running out and so made good their escape.This newspaper understands that the men were able to take with them phone cards, laptops, cash and jewellery.Police sources also confirmed that the perpetrators managed to get hold of the businessman’s hand and shot guns, which they also took with them.According to the relative, after fleeing from the shop, the bandits jumped into two awaiting cars: “These two cars were seen pulling off from in front of the shop and heading towards Vreed-en-Hoop side,” the relative disclosed.The Police were alerted and immediately launched an investigation. Police ranks in D Division (West Demerara) have since confirmed to Guyana Times that two persons have been arrested and are in custody assisting with investigations.However, this newspaper could not confirm whether those persons arrested were among the four bandits who barged in and terrorised the Panday family and their two customers.Meanwhile, the victims had to be taken for medical attention as a result of the beating they suffered.last_img read more

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Kids deserve smoke-free cars

first_imgThis legislation has gained the support of countless health advocates, several local governments, and columnists and newspaper editorial boards statewide. Organizations from the American Lung and Heart associations to the American Cancer Society and the California Medical Association support this important legislation. SB 7 addresses an issue that is among the highest of priorities: protecting those that cannot protect themselves. These supporting groups have argued that it is not only appropriate for the government to act, it is an obligation. More than ever, the public is aware of the serious health risks involved. According to a June 2006 Surgeon General’s Report, those exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work increase their risk of developing heart disease by 25 percent to 30 percent and lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent. It only makes sense that a greater level of protection should be given to our most vulnerable and defenseless – California’s children. Numerous other studies have shown that the still-developing lungs of children are especially at risk. Exposure has been shown to cause irreversible health problems, trigger asthma attacks and affect cognitive and developmental growth. Add recent conclusions in separate clinical studies at Harvard and Stanford universities and it becomes clear – the problem becomes even more severe than first thought. That data showed the average particulate concentration of cigarette smoke in vehicles is up to 10 times greater than the average particulate concentrations found in the homes of smokers. Ten times ? Another recent study, this one published by the Journal of Adolescent Health, concluded that exposure to secondhand smoke even lowered student test scores. Instead of telling a teacher, “The dog ate my homework,” they might say: “Mom lit up while dropping me off on the way to school this morning.” Seriously, the dangers are too great for government not to act. A few people may argue that the government should not be stepping into these types of issues. Unfortunately, this thinking ignores the real problem: Exposure to secondhand smoke is a form of child abuse, and the safety of a child must come first. In the same mind-set as government-required seat belts or mandating child safety seats, sometimes it is necessary for laws to protect the defenseless. It is worth noting that my measure, despite nationwide news coverage, has not received any formal opposition. None. If signed into law, an adult smoking in a car with minors would be cited only under a secondary infraction, meaning that the smokers could not be ticketed solely for smoking in a car with kids present; they would have to have violated another law to have been pulled over. The law carries a modest $100 fine. Clearly, my goal is not to profit – but to raise public awareness. I ask you to join me in supporting this much-needed effort to protect California’s quality of life, especially the lives and health of our children. State Sen. Jenny Oropeza, D-Carson, chairs the Senate Revenue and Taxation Committee. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityNow, imagine you are a child strapped – dare we say trapped? – in a car filled with cigarette smoke ? Do children really have a choice in making an adult put out that dangerous cigarette? When California banned smoking in the workplace and, most notably, at restaurants and bars, the idea was to ensure that people were not forced to be exposed to a harmful environment. That is because among the most important obligations of government is to protect its residents. But how broad and how far that protection extends is at the center of many policy debates we have in America. Earlier this year, I introduced Senate Bill 7, which would prohibit someone from smoking in a vehicle with a minor present. After careful thought and discussion, this bill has made its way through the California Legislature and now sits on the governor’s desk. He has until Oct. 14 to sign it, veto it or allow it to become law without his signature. By Jenny Oropeza How many times have you ever had to hold your breath while walking out of a building because of a cloud of cigarette smoke? Some may argue that you have the freedom to walk a different direction. Or what about the type of hotel room you stay in? Yes, you can opt to stay in a non-smoking room if available. last_img read more

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GAA CLUB HOPING FOR FULL HOUSE WITH FIRST EVER DRIVE-IN BINGO!

first_imgDrive-in bingo is coming to Donegal!A Donegal GAA club has been granted the first license for drive-in bingo in the county.Naomh Muire GAA club in The Rosses now hopes its car park will be bumper-to-bumper on Sunday, October 11th next.And with a guaranteed jackpot of more than €2,000 on the day, bingo players from across the county look set to descend on the West Donegal club for the day out. The novel idea is beginning to take hold in different part so the country.But Naomh Muire officials say it’s the first time a club in Donegal have tried it.Club spokesman Charlie The Yank Boyle told Donegal Daily they are hoping the drive-in bingo will take off.“It’s something a little different and it’ll be good craic. We’re still getting to grips with the planning details and how it will work but we’re hoping of a good turn-out. “People love a good game of bingo, including myself, and now they won’t even have to leave the comfort of their own car.“I hope people are luckier than me. I’ve only ever had a line once and even then, it was a wrong call because I had a wrong number.“But even apart from the fun, we’ll have some great cash prize on offer,” he said.GAA CLUB HOPING FOR FULL HOUSE WITH FIRST EVER DRIVE-IN BINGO! was last modified: September 26th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegaldrive-in bingoNAOMH MUIRElast_img read more

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MINISTER ADMITS IT WAS WRONG TO TRANSFER GARDA KILLER TO OPEN PRISON

first_imgMinister for Justice Alan Shatter said it was impossible not to think that the transfer of Garda killer Martin McDermott to an open prison was wrong, a prison he had escaped from before.  And he said “all necessary steps” will be taken to ensure that mistakes such as the escape of the convicted Raphoe man two weeks ago do not happen again.The Minister was responding to a report by the Irish Prison Service last night on the circumstances surrounding the transfer to, and escape from, Loughan House of prisoner McDermott. McDermott, 26, escaped from the Co Cavan prison on March 15th. He was arrested the next day at a friend’s house in Derry.He had been convicted of killing Garda Gary McLoughlin after striking the patrol car in which he was sitting in a speeding vehicle in December 2009. Sentenced in July 2011, he was jailed for eight years for the manslaughter of Garda McLoughlin.McDermott has escaped from the same prison in 2007, returning six days later. This was before he killed Gda McLoughlin.Last night, Mr Shatter said having considered the report, “it was impossible to avoid the conclusion” that the transfer of McDermott to the open prison was wrong.He said “sufficient consideration was not given to the gravity of the heinous offence” committed as well as to other criteria, and he had been assured by the director general of the Irish Prison Service that steps were being taken to prevent such a recurrence.It’s not known yet whether or not Mr Shatter has personally apologised to the family of Gda McLoughlin.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldailyMINISTER ADMITS IT WAS WRONG TO TRANSFER GARDA KILLER TO OPEN PRISON was last modified: March 29th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:escapeGarda Gary McLoughlinMartin McDermottlast_img read more

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MAN HIT GARDA IN FACE WITH LIT CIGARETTE

first_imgA bench warrant has been issued for a Castlefin man who flicked a lit cigarette into the face of a Garda.Harper failed to appear at Letterkenny District Court.Damien Harper was due to appear before Letterkenny District Court to answer public order charges yesterday. However Harper, 43, of The Red House, The Diamond, Castlefin, failed to appear.The court was told that Harper threatened to “take out” Gardai at Crossroads, Killygordon when approached.He began using hand signals to Gardai, called them ‘pig f****’ and refused to leave the area.He then threw a lit cigarette at Gardai and hit one of them in the face before being arrested.Solicitor Kieran O’Gorman said his client was highly intoxicated on the night in question.Judge Paul Kelly issued a bench warrant for Harper, who has seven previous convictions after he failed to appear.MAN HIT GARDA IN FACE WITH LIT CIGARETTE was last modified: April 14th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:abusearrestcastlefincigarettecourtDamien HarperdonegalGardailast_img read more

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Man fined for not complying with smoking laws in pub he ran

first_imgA Co Donegal man was fined €50 for having a pub smoking shelter that didn’t comply with law.Paul McClure, 38, of Church Road, Carndonagh, was accused of a number of breaches of the Tobacco Act when he appeared before Carndonagh District court. The court heard that Mr. McClure was the former licensee of The Carman’s Inn pub at Ture, Muff, and that he leased it from Mr. John Ryan.Mr. McClure was accused of having a smoking shelter which was too enclosed, having possession of a self-service cigarette machine without a licence, and also not having the cigarette machine in sight of the staff working in the pub.The Carndonagh man pleaded guilty to all charges before him at the sitting of the District Court.The court heard from Mary Costello, an environmental health officer with the HSE, who said she visited the Carman’s Inn in Muff on January 15 this year. She said she entered the pub through the smoking shelter at the rear where she immediately noticed a self serving cigarette vending machine, which was on and working.Miss Costello said she spoke to Mr McClure, who had recognised her when she came in, about the smoking shelter and the vending machine.“He confirmed to me that he was selling cigarettes, however he was not registered to sell them, “ said Ms. Costello.“He said he was trying to negotiate with the company over the fee. He also admitted that he allowed people to smoke in the shelter at the rear but there was no one in there when I called. I got measurements and took photographs and left. When I returned later there were two people in the shelter and both were smoking cigarettes.”The court heard that the smoking shelter was a basic wooden structure and that 89 per cent of the structure was covered by walls.Ms. Costello described the shelter as being “very enclosed”.She told the judge that she had attended the premises that morning before the court sitting in Carn. She said the pub was closed but she was able to access the shelter from the car park at the back. She noted that “some modifications and improvements” had taken place.The environmental health inspector also noted that there were no ‘no smoking’ signs in the shelter, and regarding the cigarette machine she said it was not positioned in the correct place. She said these must be in line of sight for staff working in the bar in order to ensure that no one under the age of 18 years was able to buy cigarettes from it.The court heard that the cigarette machine in the Carman’s was located down a back hall and definitely not in line of sight of the staff working on the premises.Defence solicitor Ciaran MacLochlainn said his client, Mr. McClure, had been in dispute with the landlord Mr. Ryan. He claimed the landlord had refused to put the smoking area in order.Mr. MacLochlainn said Mr. McClure was the tenant from June 2011, and remained there for more than four years. However he said that he parted company with the landlord ‘on bad terms’ and they were still in dispute.Mr. MacLochlainn said his client was now unemployed and in ‘dire circumstances’. He asked the judge for leniency in the case as he pleaded guilty at the first opportunity and was co-operative.Judge Paul Kelly said he would take note of Mr. McClure’s circumstances and situation. However, he said as Mr. McClure was the occupier for four and a half years the onus was on him to be compliant with the tobacco law.Judge Kelly fined Mr McClure €50 on the first charge and applied the Probation Act on the remaining charges. He also ordered Mr. McClure to pay €700 in prosecution costs.Man fined for not complying with smoking laws in pub he ran was last modified: November 2nd, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CarndonaghcourtdonegalSMOKINGlast_img read more

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Giants hitting coach Alonzo Powell discusses offense’s struggles, adjusting to AT&T Park

first_imgST. LOUIS–There were days when the Giants’ offense looked like it was destined for improvement.After the club finished dead last in the major leagues in home runs and 29th in runs scored a season ago, the Giants showed early signs that things may be different this year.Brandon Belt was poised for a career year. Brandon Crawford was the best hitter in the National League for a six-week stretch. High-profile offseason acquisitions Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria started to turn their seasons …last_img read more

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Making Healthier, Greener Foam Insulation

first_imgFlame retardants used in foam insulationWe don’t want insulation materials to catch fire, so it is logical to add flame retardant (FR) chemicals to these materials if it will prevent them from catching fire. That’s the reason HBCD (hexabromocyclododecane) is added by all polystyrene insulation and TCPP (Tris [1-chloro-2-propyl] phosphate) is added to most polyisocyanurate and spray polyurethane foam insulation. These are both halogenated flame retardants — the first using bromine, the second chlorine. RELATED ARTICLES GBA Encyclopedia: Rigid Foam Insulation Polystyrene Insulation: Does It Belong in a Green Building?Avoiding the Global Warming Impact of InsulationInsulation to Keep Us Warm — Not Warm the PlanetCalculating the Global Warming Impact of Insulation The efficacy of flame retardants compared with thermal barriersCombustion studies that were done in the 1970s showed that if the insulation is not protected with a thermal barrier, there is no correlation between the presence of flame retardant and the extent of the resultant fire. Thus, the inclusion of a flame retardant does not seem to appreciably increase the fire resistance of foam insulation, according to a peer-reviewed technical paper recently published in the journal Building Research and Information.However, thermal barriers like 1/2-inch drywall work extremely well at containing fires. The 15-minute protection provided by 1/2-inch drywall gives occupants time to escape a fire. In other words, of the two measures used to impart fire safety to a building assembly (flame retardants in foam insulation and thermal barriers) almost all of the fire safety benefit is provided by the thermal barrier. The problem with these halogenated flame retardants is that they have significant health and environmental risks. The HBCD that is used in all polystyrene (both extruded and expanded) is being targeted for international phase-out by the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. It is highly persistent in the environment and bioaccumulative in the food chain; it is believed to cause reproductive, developmental, and neurological impacts. Less is known about the TCPP used in spray polyurethane foam and polyisocyanurate, but there is significant concern in the health and environmental community.Building codes require that foam-plastic insulation meet a very specific flammability standard. But building codes also require — for most applications — that foam insulation has to be separated from living space by thermal barriers, such as gypsum drywall. As readers of this blog know, I’ve come down fairly hard on certain types of foam insulation over the years. The downsides include the blowing agents used in extruded polystyrene (XPS) and most closed-cell spray polyurethane foam and the flame retardants that are added to all foam-plastic insulation to impart some level of fire resistance.Now there’s an effort afoot to change building codes in a way that would allow manufacturers to remove the hazardous flame retardants. This is the subject of a just-published feature article in Environmental Building News (log-in required).This is a significant energy issue, because layers of foam insulation provide the easiest way to achieve the level of energy performance needed to approach net-zero-energy performance. If we’re going to add a lot of foam insulation to our homes, we want that to be safe for the occupants and the environment.center_img Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. Changing building codes to allow elimination of flame retardantsBecause the vast majority of the fire safety in a building enclosure is provided by the thermal barrier, a group of environmentally aware architects, chemists, and code experts is seeking to change building codes to allow non-FR foam to be used in applications where adequate protection is provided by a thermal barrier. (Full disclosure: I have been involved in this initiative.)The code change would allow the FR-free foam to be used below-grade, where the insulation is sandwiched between concrete and earth (hardly a fire risk), and where the foam is separated from the living space by a 15-minute thermal barrier, such as 1/2-inch drywall.For the former application (below-grade insulation), I believe it’s a no-brainer. Over half of XPS is installed below-grade, so I think there could be a very viable product free of flame retardants for this application. The change to building codes wouldn’t mandate the elimination of flame retardants, but it would give manufacturers the option to do so if they chose to. Eliminating the flame retardant for above-grade applications where there is a 15-minute thermal barrier isn’t a slam-dunk, but I believe the case being made is strong.Changing building codes, however, is a long, challenging process; I don’t know what chances the initiative has. In my article research, manufacturers expressed reservations that they don’t want to have to produce, distribute, and market two different lines of material, and they point out that they also have to be concerned with fire safety of material being stored and during construction (before drywall is installed).On the other hand, though, foam insulation manufacturers spend a lot to incorporate flame retardants into their products. The insulation contains a not-insignificant amount of these chemicals: 12.5% TCPP in open-cell spray polyurethane, 4% TCPP is closed-cell spray polyurethane, and 2.5% HBCD in extruded polystyrene. A lot of the strategies for “greening” building products increase the manufacturing costs, while removing expensive flame retardants should reduce costs. So there is some interest by the industry in this change.As described in our Environmental Building News article this month, “Getting Flame Retardants Out of Foam Insulation,” the code-change initiative is being targeted, initially, at the International Residential Code. If successful, an effort to change the International Building Code (for commercial buildings) will follow.last_img read more

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BBC Resurrects Early Sound-Effects Machines On The Web

first_img5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… No Flash RequiredFor each retro sound-making device, the site has historical information, a live simulator demo and the source code used to create it. The kicker? It was all built without a touch of Flash or anything other than open, cross-device-friendly Web standards. The team at the BBC utilized the Web Audio API, which uses JavaScript to process and synthesize audio in the browser. It’s the kind of thing developers once had no choice but to rely on Flash for, but is now easily achievable using lighter weight, more open technology.  As for the interfaces, those were done using frameworks like backbone.js and jQuery, alongside custom-built elements developed in house at the BBC. Each demo has a detailed technical breakdown showing how it was built. This is awesome. Not just because it gives us fun little browser-based synthesizers to play with, but because of what demos like this mean for the Web. For the last two or three years, developers have been moving away from clunky, proprietary technologies like Flash and Silverlight and, whenever possible, using HTML, CSS and JavaScript to build complex interfaces and embed multimedia. The result is a smoother experience that works across devices and browsers without the need for extra plugins. And yes, simulating old-fashioned gun shots using a graphical UI in the browser while you should be working? That’s cool too.  john paul titlow 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Related Posts We take our ability to create sounds for granted. Today’s software and synthesizers allow any teenager to take a sample of any sound, manipulate it any fashion imaginable, forming entirely new sounds. If they so desire, they can create their own album of electronic soundscapes. Today, anybody with even minimal training can be a sound producer, DJ or radio host. We’ve come a long way. Back in 1958, though, sound was not so easy to create and play with. But the then relatively young medium of radio demanded sound effects like gunshots and new music for a growing line-up of audio programs. To meet the needs of show producers, the BBC launched the Radiophonic Workshop, a sound effects lab where musicians and sound engineers created fake gun shots by slapping rulers on a table, used analog tape loops and built pre-synthesizer sound effects machines. Interactive, Web-based simulations of those early machines are now available, thanks to the BBC’s Research & Development Department, which recently launched a fascinating prototype showcasing four digital noisemakers. The fun site features a gun-shot sound effect generator, a pre-synthesizer “wobbulator,” a trio of tape loop machines and an early ring modulator, which was used to generate the robot voice on the original Dr. Who. 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#audio#BBC#sound#web standards last_img read more

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