Turns of narrative

first_imgClaire Messud announced her professional intentions at the age of 6, asking for a typewriter for Christmas — because, she told her parents, she wanted to be a writer. It was a prescient request. Messud is the author of a book of novellas and four novels, including “The Emperor’s Children,” a best-seller about a group of family and friends in New York in the months before the Sept. 11 attacks, and, most recently, “The Woman Upstairs.” She was a 2004-2005 Radcliffe Fellow, and last year joined the English Department as a senior lecturer. This is the first installment in “Decisions and Revisions,” a series of interviews with Harvard-affiliated writers on how their stories take shape. GAZETTE: When did you first know you wanted to be a writer?MESSUD: I always loved stories, and as soon as I realized that making them up was something you could actually do, it was what I wanted.GAZETTE: You write in the afterword of “The Woman Upstairs” that your mother’s letters taught you how to write. What did you mean?MESSUD: On both sides my parents came from massively epistolary families. We have in our basement boxes and boxes of letters from my grandparents to my parents. My mother was a wonderful letter-writer, her letters made up of all the things that fill creative writing classes, the things that I am trying to teach young writers about: noticing detail or listening to conversations, listening and just writing it down, just observing. When I went to boarding school my mother would write to me maybe three times a week. And when I lived overseas for years she would write me aerograms. I have many, many letters from her. When I was growing up, I wrote letters like that, too. I would spend my summers as a temporary secretary with an IBM Selectric in somebody’s office, and when there was a lull I would type letters to my friends. … I miss that. I don’t do it anymore.GAZETTE: Can you describe your writing process?MESSUD: I write by hand. I have all sorts of little, what you would call in French manies, but manias sounds too crazy. I have particular pens and particular paper, graph paper. I write really small, which is a problem now that my middle-aged eyes are failing. The pens that I like best are actually for art, they have a very fine nib, but .05 microball ones will do. But it has to be little, because if you use a fat nib on the small graph paper, then you can’t read it. I prefer a certain kind of paper made by Rhodia, and I get about four typed pages on a page. There are about 70 or 80 pages in a notebook, so you feel like that should do it. It’s always been a book a pad.‘Even if you have an idea of how you want a piece to end, by the time you have created these people and set them in motion, they have their own laws, their own organic natures, and they don’t always want to fit your ideas.’GAZETTE: Do you write on both sides?MESSUD: No, when I make corrections they have to go on the back of the page. There are a lot of stars and arrows and little numbers. And sometimes you realize you want to add something, so in that case, I block off part of the bottom of the page and put a star there. I write articles and book reviews on my computer, but I don’t write any fiction on it.GAZETTE: Why the separate processes?MESSUD: Often when I am writing journalism, it needs to get done more quickly. Having been in my youth frequently a temporary secretary, I can type really fast, but that can be a problem because you have something in your head and you type it and you look at it and it’s in a nice font, it looks all but printed, it looks OK. But when I am writing it by hand, I think more carefully about it, it’s just a different rhythm for me. Then it’s there, marks on the page. When I then type it into the computer, I make changes, too. And then I print it out and make other changes on the printed page. But when you write in ink on paper, you know what you’ve changed because you can still see it even if you crossed it out. You know when something was added later. Once it’s in the computer you lose that.GAZETTE: Is there something that comes easier to you now with your writing?MESSUD: I don’t know … I am oddly mistrustful of ease. In the process of revision, things have become clearer with age. It’s easier for me to see what’s wrong, not when I’m writing, but when I go back. That doesn’t mean I know how to fix it, but when I was younger I could sense that something was wrong, but I couldn’t say what it was. Now I can see, “You know what, there’s a pacing problem, or this character isn’t on the page.”I am a great fan and friend of the Australian writer Peter Carey, and I remember him saying at one point to me, about writing books, “If it doesn’t seem impossible, it doesn’t seem worth doing.” The project each time is different, and you never know how to do it. If you knew how to do it before you started, you might not bother.GAZETTE: How do you know when the work is done?MESSUD: The first writing is such a visceral thing. The last months of working on a first draft are like when you’re in a European town that you’ve never been to before and you want to get to the cathedral: You can see its spire but you don’t know exactly how far away it is. Maybe you think “it will probably take me a half an hour,” and then, weirdly, it ends up only taking 10 minutes. Or maybe it takes two hours. But when you are at the cathedral you know you are there. And I think with a first draft, which is not revision, I’ve had that feeling numerous times. I know I’m trying to get these things down, but I’m not sure how long it will take or how much it will involve and then I find, oh, I am at the cathedral, here it is.Revision is really hard, because at some point the deadlines of life play a part. You could keep on revising, you never feel like it’s done. … But then, surprisingly, it turns out that there’s always more time. If you feel it’s not done, people will tend to agree with you. If an editor is pressing you for something and you say, “OK, it’s not ready but here it is,” they will inevitably say, “You’re right, fix that.”GAZETTE: Is it harder to start or to finish a book?MESSUD: Good question, hard answer. They are hard in different ways. That’s like saying: Which is harder, takeoff or landing? And as we know almost all accidents take place on either takeoff or landing. Takeoff requires a lot of energy. The thing about landing is, it’s hard to know where to land. Endings are hard because even if you have an idea of how you want a piece to end, by the time you have created these people and set them in motion, they have their own laws, their own organic natures, and they don’t always want to fit your ideas. Nabokov said: Nonsense, you made them up, you move them around. But sometimes the project changes, and what you thought was the end is not going to be the end.GAZETTE: John Irving has said that he always knows where his books are headed. Do you feel that way?MESSUD: I am always telling the students, “If you are doing something longer, have an outline, even if you change it. Have some sense of where you’re going.” Like Irving, I know in some way where I want to end up. But I also like E.L. Doctorow’s metaphor that writing is like driving on a country road at night: You know where you’re going but you can’t see beyond the headlights. So even if I know I am headed for Albany, I have to concentrate on what’s in front of me. And I don’t think I’ve ever had the moment of not knowing I was going to Albany, as it were. But what the route to Albany will look like or feel like, or how the characters will relate to one another at any given moment, you can’t always anticipate. It’s not impossible that you would end up in Rochester instead. It could happen.Messud works with “particular pens and particular paper.”GAZETTE: Do characters that you create stay with you? Or once the book is finished, do you let them go?MESSUD: You live with them; they are even in your dreams. And then, when you finish working on the book, you stop living with them in that way. If you’re like me, and you have a terrible memory, you can’t really remember what they were up to. I haven’t picked up my first novel in 20 years. I remember the main characters, but I am not even sure I could say what the minor characters were called. While you’re living with them, they’re these intense presences and then afterwards, they become like college roommates in mid-life: On some level you feel really close, and then on another, you just haven’t managed to get together for a long time.GAZETTE: Your husband is James Wood, professor of the practice of literary criticism and book critic for The New Yorker. Do you work with him at all?MESSUD: That, too, is always evolving. In our life before children, there was more time. In life before cellphones there was more time. Early on I would read him bits aloud. He didn’t like being read aloud to. He was always very nice about it but I don’t think he liked it much. Now he’s still my first reader, but not until a manuscript is well along. And we know each other well enough that if I need him just to say “keep going” then I will tell him that outright. But I also really trust him. So if he read something, and he felt, “Don’t keep going, like, really don’t keep going,” he would say so. He did say that once. I had started what became “The Emperor’s Children” and then there was 9/11 and I felt like I couldn’t write it and I started something else. I gave what I had written to him to read, maybe 20 pages. It’s the one time he really said, “No. No, you need to not do that.”GAZETTE: In an interview with The Paris Review, the novelist Elena Ferrante said: “Literary truth is entirely a matter of wording and is directly proportional to the energy that one is able to impress on the sentence.” What is your reaction to that?MESSUD: There are lots of ways to think about that sentence or to interpret it. The energy in a sentence is a very interesting and sometimes tricky thing to pin down. There are obvious ways to make a sentence more energetic, in an actual sense, such as eschewing passive constructions — that sort of thing. But the energy of truth, something that rings true, that energy is different. There are aspects of Ferrante’s series [the Neapolitan novels] that have an almost “Downton Abbey” quality, lots of events rolling along, and you think, “Is this too guilty a pleasure?” But in the books, there are also many real truths — about all sorts of things, but I think particularly about girls’ and women’s experiences. These moments have that energy, you recognize it as a reader … if you recognize a work of literature as true, it has an energy and an authority. And as readers, we want more of that. You will read 1,000 pages or you will stay up until 4 a.m. to have that.If you think of Beckett, Beckett is all truth, with everything else taken out. There is, in his work, tremendous energy, and it’s also painful and difficult to experience, even when it’s funny. When it’s all true, it’s pretty uncomfortable. The poet Glyn Maxwell once said, about the difference between prose and poetry, that poetry is all inhalation, whereas in prose, you need both inhalation and exhalation. The mundane, the digressive — these things are part of prose. It’s prosaic, after all. Part of the rhythm of prose is letting go, part of the truth-telling of prose is in its decompression.GAZETTE: In 2013 you said during a talk, “So much of what’s important in our lives never breaks the surface.” Do you consider delving into that deeper terrain a writer’s job?MESSUD: Yes, I think that’s what writing — fiction, literature — specifically is for. For me it’s about what it’s like to be alive on the planet. So much of what we live is not articulated.last_img read more

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A passion for stories

first_img Stories get an A+ Two others awarded George J. Mitchell Scholarships Spohn also made time for activities outside the classroom. She played for the women’s soccer team for two years, then switched to the track and cross country team as a junior, finally taking a break from varsity sports her senior year to focus on long-distance running and qualifying for the Boston Marathon. She also wrote for The Harvard Crimson, served on a number of student boards in the Office of the Dean of Arts and Humanities, and led The Harvard Ichthus, a student journal of Christian thought, as editor in chief. “It’s fun to bounce between worlds, both in stories and in my life,” said Spohn, who has been spending part of her time away from campus this spring working on her pilot’s license.Ironically, when Spohn began considering her post-College plans she found herself worrying she hadn’t read enough. “I kept thinking there’s just so much I want to keep learning, to keep thinking about, to keep adding seats to the seminar table.”It seemed only natural she would be drawn to the place where two of her “favorite mythmakers,” Tolkien and Lewis, studied and taught, as she searched for a program that would allow her to continue reading, researching, and asking big questions. Wherever her path leads after Oxford, Spohn knows stories will play a key role.“I do hope my research and my writing, and my engagement with people, will shine light on the ways that stories can bring people together,” said Spohn, who is also interested in helping design the “spaces, media, and institutions through which we connect over stories.”“I am not sure what this will look like, but I know that with all the technological developments we’ve seen in global communications over the past two decades — thrown into such relief by the coronavirus pandemic — we have to think deeply about what it means to engage with timeless authors and ideas in a world that looks less and less like theirs did every day.” Students celebrate the transforming experiences behind their grades This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Fantasy novels “The Chronicles of Narnia” and “The Lord of the Rings” offered the young Lauren Spohn both a window to other worlds and a “sense of continuity.” Having a father in the Air Force meant the family had to move to a new base every two years and leave many things behind. But, she recalled, “I got to take the books with me.”When Spohn heads to the University of Oxford this fall as a Rhodes Scholar, ready to pursue a master’s in intellectual history, she will again bring with her the tales she loves — from the classics to comic books — as she continues exploring how stories can connect us all.“This is really what I what I want to spend my life doing,” said the former English concentrator, “connecting people with the stories we tell, the stories in literature, and also the story of how literature itself shines a light on what’s going on in the world around it.”Spohn’s early passion sparked her lasting fascination with texts. As she devoured works by Ray Bradbury, Victor Hugo, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and many others — part of her “quixotic quest to tackle all the Penguin classics in Barnes & Noble” — she began writing down any word she didn’t know and its definition on small notecards. Spohn would flash through her expanding vocabulary list at the back of the bus on the rides home from high school soccer games, ignoring the teasing from teammates and reliving a story with every word. “Proboscis,” conjured up “Fahrenheit 451,” the dystopian novel about a future in which books are forbidden. “Phantasmagoria” evoked “Les Misérables,” the epic novel about an explosive period in French history.,“I’d remember exactly what book the word came from, what story, and where I was when I was reading that story … and what I was thinking about when I was reading through it,” said Spohn, who ended up with 2,833 flash cards and a deep appreciation for “texts in their context, and texts in conversations with my life.”Keeping those conversations going became central to her Harvard time, beginning with a seminal class in her first year, “Humanities 10,” which examined works in the English canon alongside non-Western ones. The course, an extension of her years turning pages and flashcards, opened up more connections and new worlds. “I was deep in discussions with Nietzsche, James Joyce, Homer, and Augustine, who were all talking to each other, in addition to talking to you,” said Spohn. “I think that was the coolest insight, to really discover the ways in which these texts were talking to each other and engaging with each other, [and how our discussions] changed the way we read all the previous texts.”Spohn loved the class so much she helped found a mentorship program that pairs first-years in the course with undergrads who have already been through it “to keep the conversation alive around the books that we’ve read.”Spending sophomore year studying literary criticism with Louis Menand, Harvard’s Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English, offered her “a crash course on big questions, the meta questions of literary studies,” said Spohn, and ignited her interest in intellectual history and in finding connections between literature, history, and philosophy. She went on to complete a tutorial in intellectual history in the History Department and was a research assistant in the Philosophy Department, as well as an undergraduate fellow at Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. “This is really what I what I want to spend my life doing, connecting people with the stories we tell, the stories in literature, and also the story of how literature itself shines a light on what’s going on in the world around it.” — Lauren Spohn ’20 Related 7 Harvard seniors named Rhodes Scholarslast_img read more

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Driving Digital Business with Hybrid Cloud

first_imgCorporations today must digitize their processes, personalize the customer experience, and innovate at an unprecedented pace. Yet too few have implemented the technology platform needed to truly support those objectives.Fortunately, hybrid cloud is quickly emerging as the enabler of digital business, with adoption being driven by three key forces.One driver is the nature of digital business itself. Technology advances and information availability have altered customer expectations for good. Customers expect to be able to do what they want when they want on whatever device they want, quickly and easily and with personalized service. Companies serving them must meet those expectations with new generations of fast-changing applications.Another is the imperative to become and remain agile. Digital business is not a one-time initiative, not just a new set of apps. It’s a permanent commitment to work differently, adapt quickly, and iterate faster. It’s a commitment to be technology-enabled and data-driven top-to-bottom. Such agility demands an agile platform – hybrid cloud.The most immediate driver of many implementations is cost reduction. Both McKinsey and EMC analyses have found that enterprises moving to hybrid cloud can reduce their IT operating expense by 24%. That’s a significant number, and in essence can fund the people and process changes that yield the other benefits of hybrid cloud.Where does that 24% come from? Better management yields some reductions in hardware, telecom, and facilities expense. There are even bigger gains in software licenses and software maintenance as operations are integrated, simplified, and automated. Implementing hybrid cloud can be the catalyst for rationalizing your infrastructure management software and retiring what’s underutilized or unnecessary.But the biggest reduction is to OPEX budget. The automation of hybrid cloud dramatically reduces the amount of labor needed to deploy new application software, and to monitor, operate, and make adjustments to the infrastructure. Tasks that used to take days are performed in minutes or seconds. By automating manual work, hybrid cloud creates the opportunity for dramatic IT OPEX cost reduction, and the option to redirect those savings into newer and higher value IT initiatives.Let me introduce a caveat, however: installing hybrid cloud technology is necessary, but not sufficient, for realizing the cost reductions. IT has to operate in new ways—from infrastructure management to apps and services delivery. That’s where the real changes take place.Hybrid cloud is also an opportunity to secure IT at the heart of the business action – delivering apps and brokering cloud services. This will solidify IT’s value and relevance.CIOs make the call on what technologies to put in place today so that the business is where it needs to be in three years. Hybrid cloud drives digital business while lowering cost and raising agility. It is truly a strategic investment in a more flexible way to operate that enables our enterprises to change in the future as the digital marketplace continues evolving.Read more from David Goulden on this topic in Hybrid Cloud: Platform for Digital Business.last_img read more

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Professors share research about metastatic ovarian cancer, mitochondria

first_imgBroad issues relating to the detection of metastatic ovarian cancer and mitochondrial disease were placed under a magnifying glass at the College’s most recent installment of its faculty colloquium series, which took place in Madaleva Hall on Friday.Professor of biology Calli Versagli said metastatic ovarian cancer affects thousands of women in the U.S each year, though it often goes unnoticed until it spreads or intensifies.“What’s kind of the killer of ovarian cancer is that we don’t catch it early enough,” Versagli said. “Really only about 20 percent of those who present the illness are caught in that early stage or what we call stage one. … At stage one, the cancer is still confined to one or both of the ovaries. At stage two, typically the cancer has already spread throughout the pelvic region, and eventually, stage three is more where it’s completely gone to other parts of the abdomen, and finally, at stage four, it’s gone beyond the abdomen to other particular body parts.”Versagli said 17 percent of those who earn an official diagnosis at stage four of the illness survive, highlighting the need for adjustments to both the detection process and the treatment effectiveness.“I tried to understand some of the biological mechanisms behind these cells that are at this late stage, and how we could potentially target them,” she said. “One of the interesting things about this is that these cells, more or less, travel in … what we call the peritoneal fluid to these other areas within the abdominal cavity.”Understanding the movement pattern of these cells can potentially result in advancements regarding treatment, Versagli said.“These cells — typically epithelial cells — remain attached to your organs, and if they were floating around in other places, that really wouldn’t be healthy,” she said. “My question really is … how do epithelial ovarian cancer cells survive in this free-floating environment that they encounter to travel to these secondary sites?”Versagli said she believes antioxidant enzymes, which function within the cell to maintain balance, have a role to play.“These enzymes are increased in expression, meaning that there is a higher abundance of them in higher-grade tumors,” she said. “Their involvement in metastasis and the spreading … hasn’t been studied at all. So that’s really my major objective in my lab.”To achieve this ambition, Versagli said she obtained commercially-available ovarian cancer cells and put them in environments that simulate the free-floating atmosphere they encounter in metastatic ovarian cancer. “One of the first antioxidant enzymes I looked at was catalase,” she said. “I over-expressed catalase in these cells and put them into the soft-agar assay to see how well they survive. Interestingly enough, I found that when you over-express catalase in these ovarian cancer cells, we actually have an increased [number] of colonies that form, really suggesting that these cells seem to have an advantage over others at surviving in this free floating environment.”Conducting this research would not have been nearly as possible or as rewarding without the help of several students, she said. “It’s been a very interesting and exciting road for us,” Versagli said. Assistant professor of chemistry and physics Jennifer Fishovitz said a nuanced understanding of mitochondria’s purpose served as an essential component of her research about mitochondrial diseases.“Most of the cell’s energy that it needs to perform its daily tasks is produced in the mitochondria,” Fishovitz said. “The breakdown of [adenosine triphosphate] in the cell is used to power things like muscle contraction and chemical reactions.”Pollution, drugs, pesticides and other toxins can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, Fishovitz said, so studying proteins — particularly enzymes called proteases that break down other proteins — comprised a large portion of her research. “We take a DNA sequence that encodes for the protein that we want to study, and we put it into bacteria, and we take advantage of the machinery within the E.coli to use this DNA and to convert it into many copies of our protein,” she said. “We take that protein and test its activity in a test tube.”Mitochondrial fusion allows for the passage of information between two mitochondria at a point of cleavage, Fishovitz said. “We want to study whether or not this cleavage event … is beneficial for the cell,” she said. “We know it’s cleaved in the cell, but we don’t know what effect it has on the cell.”Identifying the exact site of cleavage will be beneficial in determining whether this transfer has beneficial or adverse implications.“There are various ways that we can do this,” she said. “One of these ways is using fluorescents. We can take this peptide and, on one end, we can put a fluorescent donor. When you put energy on it, it emits fluorescents. On the other end, you put a fluorescent quencher. … When this peptide is in tact, the donor and the quencher are close enough in space that you don’t see any fluorescent emission because it’s all absorbed by the quencher.”In the absence of adenosine triphosphate, Fishovitz said she did not observe any fluorescent emission, and in the presence of adenosine triphosphate, she said she saw an increase of fluorescents over time.“That gives us information about how that enzyme is working,” she said. “It also gives us an experiment to test drugs that could be inhibitors of these proteins. We’re working on getting the enzymes … to a place where we can use this assay.”Tags: faculty colloquium, fluorescent donor, fluorescent quencher, mitochondria, Saint Mary’s department of biologylast_img read more

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Bug Camp

first_imgTift County, Georgia, elementary school students who are buzzing with excitement to attend the University of Georgia Bug Camp are encouraged to apply. Registration for the camp ends this Friday, May 5. The camp, hosted by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) Department of Entomology, will start Tuesday, May 30, and end on Friday, June 2. It will be held in the Nationally Environmentally Sound Production Agriculture Laboratory (NESPAL) Building on the UGA Tifton campus. Camp begins at 8:30 a.m. daily and ends at 3:30 p.m.Activities are geared toward elementary school students, but children ranging in age from kindergarten through middle school may attend.“It is designed to be very interactive,” said Breanna Coursey, camp contact in Tifton. “It does not involve sitting in the classroom all day. They’ll take some trips and go out to explore.”Children will take part in a series of activities and labs taught by CAES entomologists and students. Lessons will cover the good and bad effects of insects on the community, the spread of diseases by insects and ways in which insects pollinate crops. Campers will also collect insects.“We want students to have the opportunity to have fun and enjoy their summer,” Coursey said.There have been several bug camps on the UGA Athens campus, but this is UGA-Tifton’s first. Marianne Shockley, UGA Cooperative Extension entomologist, designed the camp and is excited about the impact it could have in Tifton.“These camps are exciting because they introduce students to a lot of insects they may not have known about before. Children need to know that not all bugs are bad, but they also need to be made aware of the dangers of some insects that we may take for granted,” Shockley said. Registration for the camp is available at blog.caes.uga.edu/bugcamp/registration. Registration must be completed online. The cost to attend the camp is $130 and can be paid online or by mail. Checks should be made payable to “UGA” and mailed to University of Georgia, Department of Entomology, 120 Cedar Street, Biological Sciences Rm. 413, Athens, GA 30602.Discounts are available for families with multiple children attending Bug Camp and for UGA employees’ children.last_img read more

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Judge Allows Bankrupt Peabody to Pay Up to $3.4 Million in Bonuses to White-Collar Employees

first_imgJudge Allows Bankrupt Peabody to Pay Up to $3.4 Million in Bonuses to White-Collar Employees FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Jacob Barker for the St. Louis Post Dispatch:Peabody Energy won approval for a bonus plan for nonexecutives that it says will help retain “mission critical” employees.In a hearing Wednesday in bankruptcy court in St. Louis, Judge Barry Schermer ruled in favor of Peabody, saying the company’s plan “targets those that are in a position to help guide this reorganization.”Peabody this month asked for the authority to pay out as much as $3.24 million in bonuses to keep workers in its finance, legal, sales, marketing, information technology and human resources departments from jumping ship as the company moves through bankruptcy. The majority of the 42 people targeted with retention bonuses are in Peabody’s St. Louis headquarters, a spokesman said.The largest coal company in the country filed for Chapter 11 in April due to a high debt load and a sharp drop in coal demand in the face of low natural gas prices and tightening environmental regulations.“The kind of people we are seeking to provide awards to under this program are mobile” and can take their skill sets to industries outside of coal mining, Peabody attorney Heather Lennox told the judge.Objections to the program came from United Mine Workers of America pension and health care funds, which argued the payments could come at the expense of money apportioned for retiree benefits. Peabody already reduced payments to one of the retiree health funds by $70 million in a deal struck prior to its bankruptcy.“Slashing the health benefits of aged and medically vulnerable retirees with extremely limited resources, while lavishly rewarding white-collar employees, is neither fair nor reasonable,” the UMWA argued in court filings.Full article: Court OKs retention bonuses for mid-level workers at Peabody Energylast_img read more

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Plenty of Jon Stewart in Trevor Noah’s ‘Daily Show’ Debut

first_imgFrom there, the tapes rolled out the first Noah-hosted news clip montage—from NBC to CNN to Fox. Noah critiqued the overhyped media coverage of Pope Francis and expressed disappointment in House Speaker John Boehner’s abrupt resignation. He wasn’t so much upset about the Ohio Republican’s departure as he was over the loss of good comedic material.“I just got here!” Noah complained. “I got a fancy suit and a new set. I learned how to pronounce your name.”But all is not lost. There’s still the 2016 presidential election. In the mean time, he took on this more immediate issue: Who will the Republicans pick to replace Boehner as their Congressional leader?After all, Noah noted with with longtime Daily Show “correspondent” Jordan Klepper, if the wrong guy got the job, it could lead to a complete disaster.“I mean, wow, those are big shoes to fill,” Noah said.“I’m sure they’ll find someone extremely qualified,” Klepper said matter of factly.“But this is John Boehner!” responded Noah with feeling. “Whoever takes that job will probably fall flat on their face in front of the entire nation.”“I get how you’re feeling,” remarked Klepper. “Taking over for John…Boehner is hard.” Get More: Comedy Central,Funny Videos,Funny TV Shows Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Trevor Noah welcomed viewers from behind a new fancy wooden desk, part of an entirely new studio set. The opening words sounded the same, but with a twist: “From Comedy Central’s World News Headquarters in New York, this is The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.”And so began the second most anticipated transition in late-night television this year–after Comedy Central’s Stephen Colbert took over for David Letterman–Noah’s replacing Jon Stewart.“Growing up in the streets of South Africa, I never dreamed that I would one day have, well, two things, really,” the 31-year-old comic said. “An indoor toilet and a job as host of The Daily Show. I’m quite comfortable with one of them.”Who could blame him? Viewers may recall Trevor Noah as a Daily Show correspondent before Jon Stewart’s final episode on Aug. 6, but the skeptical media labeled him as the South African-raised outsider and a young millennial draw-in who was “stepping into big shoes.” Noah paid tribute to his predecessor by vowing to continue Stewart’s near legendary “war on bullshit.”No pressure there.According to Noah, he wasn’t Comedy Central’s first choice. He wasn’t even their second option. Women and men declined the offer, Noah explained in his opening.“So, once more,” he quipped, “a job Americans rejected is now being done by an immigrant.”But he harbored no resentment. Actually, he sounded almost grateful.“And to you, the Daily Show viewers—both new and old, at home or on your phone—thank you for joining us as we continue the war on bullshit.” Moving on, the discovery of water on Mars and an interview with superstar comedian Kevin Hart took up the remainder of the show. Perhaps the most interesting part of the Mars segment was the debut of Roy Wood Jr. as The Daily Show‘s newest correspondent. As for Hart, he dominated the interview, which is not surprising given his dynamic personality.It’s difficult to compare Noah to Stewart. Where Stewart verbally assaulted deserving media and political buffoons, Noah analyzed topics from multiple angles and then carefully dissected his way to a story’s rotten core. He didn’t attack his targets.Jon Stewart will sorely be missed, but audiences should not expect Noah to be his clone, either—something Stewart’s arch nemeses are probably grateful for.In short, Comedy Central’s promo motto for Noah’s Daily Show takeover was no joke: “Same chair, different ass.” Get More: Comedy Central,Funny Videos,Funny TV Showslast_img read more

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November is Caribbean Tourism Month

first_img Share 9 Views   no discussions Share Roseau, Dominica – November 8, 2011 –As a member of the Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO), Dominica joins the rest of the Caribbean in celebrating the first Caribbean Tourism Month during November. This year the month is celebrated under the theme ‘One Sea, One Voice, One Caribbean’.The objectives of Caribbean Tourism Month is to raise awareness among Caribbean people of the importance of tourism in the Caribbean, to enhance the profile of the Caribbean tourism sector in the marketplace, to reflect on the invaluable impact of tourism on the economic, social and cultural wellbeing in the Caribbean, to attract positive media coverage of the Caribbean and the local tourism product and to celebrate the diversity of what the Caribbean offers.In observance of the month, the Discover Dominica Authority, in collaboration with local organizations and youth groups will initiate activities centered on litter management, familiarization visits to tourism sites and tourism awareness programmes.Press ReleaseDiscover Dominica Authority LocalNews November is Caribbean Tourism Month by: – November 8, 2011center_img Tweet Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Speedy release of sick, elderly inmates mulled

first_img“Mag-setako, 70 years old or 75, 70. Hindi na marunong mag-holdup ‘yan. Hindi na makatakbo ‘yan. O kung takotka pa kay serial rapist, ipaputol nalang muna mo diyan sa founder nilabago palabasin,” Duterte added. MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte wanted toexpedite the release of sick and elderly inmates who are detained inside theNew Bilibid Prison in Muntinlupa City. Duterte, meanwhile, admitted some inmatesabove 70 years old refused to get out of the national penitentiary as they wereconsidered outcasts in the society. Duterte on Tuesday said he will ask Departmentof Justice (DOJ) secretary Menardo Guevarra and prison officials for the earlyrelease. President Rodrigo Duterte says he will ask Justice secretary Menardo Guevarra and other prison officials to expedite the release of sick and elderly inmates who are detained inside the New Bilibid Prison in Muntinlupa City. PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO “Alam moba ‘yang nasa kulungan na umabot na ng 15, 20years? Ayaw nang lumabas ‘yan,”Duterte said. “‘Yang sa penal colony,‘pag ini-release mo, maghanap ‘yan ng problema.” The NBP is one of the penal colonies under thecontrol and supervision of the Bureau of Corrections./PN “Wala na‘yan eh. Lalo na ‘yung mga 80s. What’s the use of keeping themthere?” he said. “Mag-holdupng one time ‘yan, mag-enjoy, taposgustong bumalik ng presohan. Kasi ang buhay nila for the last 20 years, nandiyan na sa kulungan. Kuntento na ‘yan sakanila,” he added.last_img read more

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Traffic Light Expected To Be Fixed By Friday Morning

first_imgImage ProvidedDrivers in Batesville may have noticed a faulty traffic light at a busy intersection Thursday.Officers with the Batesville Police Department have been controlling traffic throughout the afternoon and evening on S.R. 229 at the I-74 overpass.Maintenance crews are on the scene repairing a component on the light Thursday evening.The traffic signal should be working properly by the Friday morning commute. According to a Batesville Police Department spokesman, the light is expected to be repaired by midnight.last_img read more

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